Social Science - Other

Will Written Text Survive as a Communication Medium – Yes



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The written word has been used since it was first shaped in clay tablets 6,000 years ago. Written text will certainly survive as a communication medium because we use it to the extent that it would mean sometimes life or death.

I believe forgetting about written text is a terrible thing. There are reasons for this:

1) You finally became a parent of a beautiful child, your child grows up to be ready for the first time to spend in school. Does your child know how to operate a complex machine like a computer? That's a maybe but what if he/she grows up not being able to know how to write at all? If he/she is asked to fill out a form (written text) for a job, how will he/she know how to fill out? Certainly the person will not get the job.

Today as a society, we are advancing in technology faster as days pass by. Computers for the most part will always take place for 98% of our lives. Unlike the past, PCs give you the abilities to type instead of write, which makes it easier for you create documents faster and make them look colorful or stylish. However, we depend too much on them.

Go anywhere in America and I am certain you will begin to observe that some people can speak but don't know how to write or have forgotten to write.

A second reason why written text is so helpful at times is its simplicity. Using a device for communication for "writing" is also helpful but technology has its down side. On the other hand, you pick up a paper and pen and start putting down words and take your time to write a letter or story or whatever.

A third reason is its available anywhere. What this means is you can take or make something into a writing utensil and even start to carve words out. Written text doesn't just mean pencil and paper. Sometimes in the movies, the protagonist is stuck in an island where there is nothing like computers or voice recorders or pens or papers. He/she has to find a way to make a message of words in the sand large enough for someone with help to notice it.

A fourth reason why written text is so helpful is planning. Certainly you can't picture an entire essay in your head. You have to plan it out first. This is where writing becomes helpful. You can see that writing has been in use for as long as humans existed. The cave painting you see done by prehistoric early man are all part of writing. Writing is so expressive. It can come in Logo-grams, syllabaries and alphabet (Alphabet is the most common one today).

I truly believe that this type of communication has been an honor given to us because it helped us accomplish so much in so little time. Written text can make a person unique. From based on what the person wrote, we can tell a lot about him. Historians, archaeologists, meteorologists, and many other scientists depend on this form of communication. Talking alone isn't going to help. Sometimes things are better understood in words that are written down.

Written text keeps a record of our history so it can be known to our future descendants. Written text can stand the test of time. Our voices will not be heard forever. That's why we should preserve it.

"Quantity produces quality. If you write a few things, you are doomed"-Ray Bradbury. The quotes are true. No one is going to buy a book with 12 words and count it as a story, it's ridiculous. Writing can keep us entertained and use our imaginations. It's expressive. I am sure you heard the saying "a picture can spell a thousand words". I am saying that written text is almost as important as other things in our lives because it's a hobby for some people like me and it's a part of who we are. "The way you define yourself as a writer is that you write every time you have a free minute. If you didn't behave that way you would never do anything."- John Irving.

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