Marine Biology

Why does the Giant Squid Pass Food through its Brain



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Giant Squids fall in the class of deco-pods and that is because they have ten arms. Eight arms are of the same length, while the remaining two arms are much longer. The two long arms are called tentacles and these tentacles extend out from the Giant Squid's head. These tentacles catch their prey. The arms have very sharp teeth which allows the food to be minced into very tiny pieces. Giant Squids have a donut-shaped brain. After the food passes through the throat and the esophagus it then passes through the brain. It all starts with the arms being attached to the head. The food then is digested in the stomach. The food must be small to pass through the brain because it can cause brain damage if large pieces is caught in the brain.

Giant Squids have eyes that are larger than a basketball. They live deep in the ocean, so it is really hard to observe them. They fall in the category of some of the largest animals on earth and they are really amazing creatures. Giant Squids have been thriving in the oceans for millions of years. Evolutionary biologists are scientists who study them. These squids have small stomachs and the digestion of the food takes place in their stomachs. They are closely related to the octopus and they both have a complex nervous system. About 80% of their brain is used to process visual information and the other 20% is used to send food to the stomach where it is digested.

This ocean creature has blue blood that contains a copper compound. The internal anatomy of the squid is still being researched and that is because they make their home in the depths of the deepest oceans. To breathe, they have gills that extract oxygen from seawater. Many people refer to them as giant sea monsters. They can move through the water at a speed of about 20 miles per hour. They can eat up to 500 pounds of food that include fish, shark, and other ocean creatures. These giant squids live at depths so deep that no light penetrates there. They are able to detect prey by using alternative light sources.

The giant squid's food passes through the brain before it reaches the stomach because of the arms and tentacles that are attached to the head. Many deep water submarines are sent to the ocean floor to observe these ocean creatures. Some people refer to them as beasts of the ocean. Stories have been told in legends of sailors being eaten by these giant creatures. The Sperm Whale is much larger than the giant squid and it hunts the giant squid for food.

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