Psychology

Where to see the Rorschach Test Inkblot Test



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The inkblot test, named after Hermann Rorschach who invented the examination in 1921 has had ten images made public by Wikipedia. The test has been highly secretive in order to keep the results effective, but the accuracy of this test is still debatable among the general scientific community. With some images now in the public, the web has seen a surge of traffic from people searching for them. It is a nice change of pace for users to be looking to see something other than the victimized Erin Andrews naked through a peephole.

Who knew Wikipedia could come up with such a big scoop. I screamed for hours when I ran into Sinbad at a casino a year ago, considering he had been pronounced dead on the user edited site. The point of the Rorschach test has to do with the subconscious or inner feelings or something. I am not sure how to interpret results, but I saw an overweight Kevin Federline in one of them...no wait that was on a California golf course.

The test comes complete with suggested answers, taking the fun of the exam out. In this instant-results driven age, it is surprising that the test blotches were not available sooner. Look at your own risk however, since the one marked "two humans" looks downright dirty. Look closely at the one that Wikipedia calls" pink animal" and you can find the 104 MLB players who tested positive for steroids in 2003.

It is uncertain how the exposure of the blots online will affect the test in the future. Along with the images, details of the procedure were also exposed on the web. The test is still taught throughout the mass majority of college psychology programs even though it is close to ninety years since the creation of it. A lot has changed since then, especially science. This latest exposure could be a good thing as it puts the old test in the spotlight, starting the debate on its effectiveness as people get a better understanding of what it entails.

I am not a psychology expert, but it does strike me as odd that a test's best asset is the secrecy surrounding the whole thing. This is all just heresy of course, but there must have been methods of acquiring samples in the past if they landed on Wikipedia. Whatever the outcome, anything that distracts us from the K-Fed photos is fine.

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More about this author: Peter L. Bosch

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