Earth Science - Other

What to do if you Find Dinosaur Bones



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If you are a digger, by choice or merely accident, you may find dinosaur bones or fossilized plants. What you do next is important to both you and the fossil.

If you find what you think is a fossil, the first thing you should do is not touch it. Cover it tightly with a tarp or other waterproof material (plastic sheeting), and contact someone who can identify it.

Protect your find from weather and intruders (two-legged and four-legged) until it can be examined.

Waiting until an archaeologist can examine your find is vital. Touching it with your bare hands, digging around it and exposing it to the elements could damage it. It is imperative that you protect it.

You should leave it where you found it so that the original place can be documented. This will include surveys to determine depth, measurements and pictures. Wait to photograph your find until the examination.

Every country, and most states, have an archaeological society. The end of this article will list the web homes for a few. These are the foremost experts in their field and can send someone to evaluate your finding.

Consider donating the piece to the archaeological society. Before they remove the fossil, you can be photographed with your piece.

Be aware that after the evaluation, depending on the nature of the fossil and the results of the evaluation, you may be interviewed by both local and national publications. Every fossil found builds knowledge that helps us understand our world.

Whether you find dinosaur bones, ancient societal artifacts or fossilized plants, your discovery opens a new door into the past!

International archaeological societies
Australia, New Zealand & Malaysia: http://www.asha.org.au/
Canada: http://www.canadianarchaeology.com/links.lasso
India: http://indarchaeology.org/archaeology/archaeology.htm
United Kingdom: http://www.britarch.ac.uk/baa/
United States: http://www.saa.org/

State archaeological societies
Arizona: http://www.azarchsoc.org/
California: http://www.scahome.org/
Colorado: http://www.coloradoarchaeology.org/
Texas: http://www.txarch.org/

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