Psychology

Improving Memory and Intelligence Exploring Cures for Everyday Memory Loss



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I watched a program on our local television the other night about improving our memory. I was thinking to myself about it as I watched the interesting information coming at me. This morning I was reflecting on if I thought this was really all mostly true or not, what I had seen on the TV last night? They said that a memory pathway, a pathway to access a memory previously stored, can be lost or broken. The more pathways, or routes or connections or different approaches and ways we build or set up to store a particular memory or event that you make, the easier to remember or recall information or the memory becomes, as there are more ways to access or to find it. They suggested using visualisation or creating a journey or story linking the memory into the story to improve and enhance the recall. Is this true or is it just overburdening the brain to do this? As Einstein said we should only fill our brain with what we will use and is useful to us to use. And I recall the fictional Sherlock Holmes had said something similar to his long time friend Watson, that he only learns what is useful in his detective field and that is useful for him to use. They never bothered learning stuff of no particular use to them, such as the number of players in a cricket match for example. Is this true or is the memory really unlimited and always available and no memory is ever lost once after happening? Everything is recorded forever, is it true? I mean there seem to be instances where hypnosis is used for example and the so called lost connections or memories are often recalled in every last detail.

To me memory once it has happened or been recorded it must be forever a part of the history of the Universe. This is like Truth, truth cannot be lost, so I feel a memory must always be accessible once made. The physicists believe this themselves when they assert that no information is ever lost. And so even in a black hole in space the information as to what has happened must always be traceable and so knowable by anyone that can follow the trail and detect the pathway the information has gone over and left its mark on. The truth of all this is the truth is just the truth. It is complicated if we see it in that way, simple if we see it that way. We do the complicating by refusing to see the simplicity. Truth is direct and instantly knowable. It is truth, not simple, but knowable directly as instant recognition. Instant recognition could be felt to be simple, as if we struggle to recognise truth it is because we are blocking it by trying to see it and colouring it to how we want to see it and so complicating it in the process. Life is just life, everything else is description and perception only. Yes, I thought to myself, no memory is ever lost, it is recorded forever in the records of all life on the great causal warehouse of storage on the third physical plane as the Occultists say where it is often called the Akashic records by spiritual traditional teachings or by mystics. But the brain itself is an instrument only, which I think can develop errors and pathways can get replaced or written over or lost through lack of use (or in the case of injury and disease). The brain does this because really it is finite and allows only the high priority memories to be present in its ready access database. It of course has access to the Akashic records or memories of the universe or universal information as the physicists would call it, for anything it really requires and can be directed to these greater recordings or information by your soul. This can be in a dream or through intuition and is proven by the fact of the many breakthroughs in discovery, science and invention discovered in this way. But yes it is up to you how you utilise your own brain. You can do certain techniques which will strengthen the associations to a particular memory and keep it in the foreground of more easily accessible data or memory. There are two or more memory banks in your brain. Short term and the various longer term memories. It is up to you if you reinforce memories to keep them short term or in a more readily accessible close by long term data bank. And yes, the more pathways you create or the more links you construct the easier you can reach or recall the memory simply because the chances of finding it are improved with it being filed and cross referenced in more ways. It is up to us really to set up our own cross referencing system to access the already existing method of storage which just puts memories similarly matched by connecting similarities together and stores them by allowing all these connections to hyperlink when required such as a computer does.

Why does our memory seem to be less than perfect then? Once upon a time our memory was exact and perfect as it is in our soul body. The memories of the lower bodies including our physical body are imperfect only in function as current memories are kept stronger than past memories to allow efficient functioning and prioritising of your life or life in general. The past memories are kept alive for perusal and reflection but drop away as current memories come in and take pride of place so to speak. Modern life has led us to think our memories are less than perfect but they are indeed perfect and it is only in the way we use them or allow them to function through lack of higher knowledge that can stop us from seeing this. Perfect here only means that they always work as they should work or are meant to work or are created to work. And usually they will do this for us unless we have some underlying loss of function or disability or injury to our system or our brain. Our soul I believe can never malfunction and is therefore always trying to achieve its purpose no matter the difficulties or circumstances or situations it finds itself in.

And that's about how it all works I thought to myself, I'll record it all before I forget it!

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