Chemistry

Cuprum Copper Blue Vitrol



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Copper, known as cuprum was named after the island of Cyprus, where it has been mined since ancient times. Copper and gold are the two most ancient metals known to man. They are unique in that both of them are the only the only colored metals. Bronze is an alloy made out of copper and tin. Bronze is used in statues or bells, metal's coins and cooking utensils. By itself copper is used to make water pipesbecause of its corrosion resistant properties. It is also a good conductor of electricity. Its electrical uses include cables, transformers, engines and superconductors. Modern superconductors are all based on ceramic materials that have copper oxide as the main component. Copper is the most conductive metal except for silver, copper is in greater use because silver is more expensive.

Copper has an atomic number of 29, atomic weight of 63.546 and a melting point of 1357.77 K (1084.62 C or 1984.32 F) Its density is 8.933 grams per cubic centimeter and it is solid at room temperature. It is classified as a metal.

Copper has been used for over 11,000 years. It is easy to mine and extract from copper ores, where is it usually found. Copy extraction has been discovered as far back as 7,000 years ago. The Roman Empire used copper for coins, kettles and ornaments, such as jewelry. Ancient people used it for jewelry.

Frequently used to make wire because of its conductivity, copper is the second most conductive metal, after silver. It is water resistant and that has made it useful for pots and pans. Copper is also used to make coins. The American penny was once made of copper, but now is made of zinc coated with copper.

Copper deposits are found around the world. You can find copper in the United States, Chile, Zambia, Zaire, Peru and Canada. Some common copper ores are called cuprite (CuO2), tenorite (CuO), malachite (CuO3Cu(OH)2), chalcocite (Cu2S), covellite (CuS) and bornite (Cu6FeS4).

The best-known copper compound is blue vitrol, a Hydrated copper sulfate (CuSO4H2O). Blue vitrol is used as an agricultural poison, to purify water and kill algae, and as a pigment in ink. In the fabric dying manufacture, cuprum in the form of Cuperic chloride is used as a fixative. In metal electroplating the form of copper called Copper cyanide (CuCN) is commonly used.

Copper is used in homeopathic medicine to treat cramps and spasms. It has been known to cure tics and seixure disorders, pertussis, and meningitis.

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