Sociology

China Capital Punishment



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According to statistics provided by: Amnesty International it was determined that the execution rate in China is in the thousands. The precise number of executions in China is a secret held by the State. Relatively-speaking, the rate of execution is extreme when compared to other World centers. The number is as many, within a period of three days as what occurs inside the United States, annually.


However, the excessive number of executions is not quite as unfavorable when you view the matter on a per capital basis. Recognize that China does have the highest population on earth: and perhaps the unfavorable rate of execution is less dramatic. Judging then, that China's mass population is approximately one billion people, then the number of executions per Capita seems more reasonable.


There are two distinct reasons why capital punishment is carried out so readily in China: a) The country's troubled court system: and b) Punishment that does not fit the offense; or offenses which are not considered capital crimes in most other countries.


You may ask: What types of crimes fall under penalty of death, besides murder in China? The following crimes are part of the list:


Certain forms of corruption;

Embezzlement;

Drug-related charges, and

Stealing performed on a mass or broad-based scale.


In example of the preceding list: an executive within the communications industry was sentenced to death for accepting bribes! Another example is that of an individual borrowing 100 million dollars for investment scheming that did not work out to his advantage. Both non-violent crimes were punishable by death! An international incident was created when three Filipinos were executed for charges of trafficking drugs.


The preceding examples clearly illustrate that due process is clearly lacking within the Chinese court system. Also, not surprising, there is much secrecy inside China's judicial system. It may be further stated, many of the sentences are doled out through means of a judicial committee. The lack of court organization is a factor, then, in China's high execution rate.


However, all the negativity aside: China's court system is changing; somewhat for the better as far as Capital Punishment is concerned. The Chinese Supreme Court was granted rights to review court cases relative to the death penalty during 2007. The court has stated it overturned fifteen percent of death penalty convictions. China, also mentioned this year it was reducing the number of crimes punishable by death. This is the first indicator of a change of this kind with regard to Capital Punishment in China since 1979. However, offenders of the types of crimes the Chinese are saying they are eliminating from the list, have infrequently received the death penalty: such as forgery in order to avoid paying taxes. Suffice it to say: China remains a prevailing global concern with regard to a high rate of capital punishment for non-violent crimes.





References:


http://pubrecord.org/world/9152/death-penalty-declines-china/


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-16137327


http://thelede.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/12/02/a-glimpse-of-death-row-in-china/


http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/mar/28/us-china-death-penalty-amnesty


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capital_punishment_in_the_People's_Republic_of_China


http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2011/09/capital-punishment-in-china/245520/



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ARTICLE SOURCES AND CITATIONS
  • InfoBoxCallToAction ActionArrowhttp://pubrecord.org/world/9152/death-penalty-declines-china/
  • InfoBoxCallToAction ActionArrowhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-16137327
  • InfoBoxCallToAction ActionArrowhttp://thelede.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/12/02/a-glimpse-of-death-row-in-china/
  • InfoBoxCallToAction ActionArrowhttp://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/mar/28/us-china-death-penalty-amnesty
  • InfoBoxCallToAction ActionArrowhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capital_punishment_in_the_People's_Republic_of_China
  • InfoBoxCallToAction ActionArrowhttp://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2011/09/capital-punishment-in-china/245520/