By: Stanley Courage Duoghah
Psychological effects refer to mental and emotional disturbances that are common to most children whose parents become divorced. Extreme depression and bottled up anger that's often temporary and released in future are the most obvious psychological effects of divorce on children, but there are others...
By: Stanley Courage Duoghah
An obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a medical term that may be used in reference to one of two types of anxiety disorders. Almost everyone suffers from anxieties and worries from time to time, but obsessive-compulsive disorders are, to some extent, abnormal cases of anxiety that...
People who belittle others are only belittling themselves
By: Christyl Rivers
We all know people who can’t stop putting others down. This is always a sign of insecurity. When we find constant fault with others, this is what pychologists call “projection.” The critic is projecting their own feelings of insecurity, which they do...
If and why we fear death
By: Andrea Gerstner
If and Why We Fear Death Fear of death, or thanatophobia means that most people are afraid of dying, almost to the point of phobia. Dr. Alex Lickerman states that people are afraid to die painfully. He goes on to say that people, because of...
By: Wayne Leon Learmond
Philosophers, going back to Aristotle and Plato, have all contemplated deeply on just what constitutes ‘consciousness’. They came to no satisfactory answer. Even now, in the 21st century, we are no further on in our search for the answer to this most intriguing question...
Why are some people smarter than others?(barring any mental illnesses)
By: Christyl Rivers
Some people are smarter than others, because they learn problem solving skills. Problem solving skills can include almost anything. A person caught in a rain storm who can come up with several solutions to stop from getting soaked, is a smart person. A person who...
By: Janet Grischy
Much of scientific research is about accurate, reliable, repeatable comparison. In controlled experiments in fields like psychology and medicine, scientists sometimes separate their subjects into two groups in order to compare them. One group is designated as the control and one as the experimental group...
How functionalism differs from structuralism
By: Robert Grice
The Enlightenment discarded metaphysical explanations for human behavior. Concepts such as “soul” and “sin” fell out of fashion. Instead, attention turned to seeking rational and naturalistic explanations for mental processes and behavior. Structuralism and Functionalism were the initial theoretical attempts to explain psychological...
By: Effie Moore Salem
Functionalism and structuralism are closely related in that structure, physical—seen, felt, touch—are often created for functions, or needs. Function relates to usage of ideas, things, and gives meaning to structure. Someone need not ask, as an example, the purpose of sloping sidewalks that...
By: Robert Grice
The field of psychology and counseling psychology in particular experienced a significant evolution in the twentieth century. The various theoretical orientations that developed over the century represented different perspectives on how the human mind works in processing information and motivating behavior. Six theoretical perspectives contribute...

 

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