How to interpret the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS)
By: Molly Froerer
The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-IV (WAIS-IV) is an IQ test that is given by psychologists and measures global intellectual functioning. It includes both verbal and nonverbal components. The average score for all tests and subtests is 100; thus, a score of over 100 is...
By: Joshua Simmet
The Elliott Wave Theory is a principle in economics that attempts to predict future prices and trends. The theory says that the trends form a pattern that, when graphed form waves, called Elliott waves. The principle is that the collective investor opinion shifts from optimism...
An overview of social identity theory
By: D. Victor
The premise of the social identity concept is that individuals partially derive their self-concepts from membership in social groups. George Mead introduced the social basis for self-definition around 1934, thus setting a base for the development of social identity theory. Henri Tajfel and John Turner...
An overview of the Fundamental Attribution Error
By: D. Victor
The fundamental attribution error is one of several attribution biases that systematically distort attributions. Also known as the correspondence bias, the fundamental attribution error refers to the tendency of observers to make internal attributions (attributing cause to the actors' motives, attitudes or actions) when perceiving...
By: Charles Ray
The efficient market theory of economics posits that financial markets reflect all known information, and that they will change instantly to reflect any new information. All securities investors have access to the available information when making market decisions, therefore, it is believed impossible for an...
By: Janet Grischy
The Elliott wave theory forecasts stock market prices by charting their movements through regular cycles. Mass psychology causes these cycles by swinging from optimism to pessimism in rhythmic waves. Prices zigzag to new highs or lows, then turn and zigzag in the other direction. In...
By: Paul Schingle
Change is a natural part of life. Worldwide, things change every, single day, though some individuals change very little over the course of time. How people adapt to change is as variable as people are, and as change is itself. How one is brought up...
Getting in touch with your deepest self
By: M. J. Joachim
Who are you? How can you get in touch with your deepest self? Breathe deep. Now, slowly exhale. Mantra! Mantra! Mantra! Feel your limbs begin to tingle as you gently sway your head to and fro. Release the tension in your shoulders; let it flow...
By: Michael Totten
The confirmation bias is the tendency to cherry pick data to fit a hypothesis, avoiding any data which disproves that hypothesis. Selective information gathering can apply either to selective memory or to selection of new data. A famous example of both is the lunar effect...
Book reviews: The Myth of Repressed Memory, False Memories and Allegations of Sexual Abuse, by Elizabeth Loftus and Katherine Ketcham
By: Philo Gabriel
Elizabeth Loftus is one of the top scientific experts in the world on human memory. Throughout her career she has been a strong, sometimes lonely, voice against the criminal hysteria of the "recovered memory" movement. I respect and applaud her for having written an important...

 

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