By: Patrick Stephen Baker
Very recently there has been some very exciting news about the fate of the Neanderthals. Seems about 4% of the Human Genome is made up of Neanderthal genes. This means that in the past modern Humans also called Homo sapiens, or sometimes Cro-Magnon Man, interbreed...
The disappearance of the Anasazi
By: Nick Ford
The Anasazi were a native people that lived in an area bordered by Utah, Arizona, New Mexico and Colorado. Although their territory corresponds to that occupied by the current Navajo Nation the Navajo and Anasazi never met. By the time the Navajo came to the...
What is culture shock?
By: Joyce Ann Mallare - 541627
Have you ever tried going to another country and you cannot understand the language, there is a different taste in food, and different habits from yours, and other examples of what you might experience the first time you visit a country? Then you are experiencing...
Archeological geology of Tel Yin'am, Galilee, Israel
By: Lian Slayford-Wei
The Archaeological Geology of Tel Yin'am, Galilee, Israel Tel Yin'am, in Lower Galilee, has been continually inhabited by people for thousands of years, from the Neolithic to the Roman Empire. Set in an alluvial fan at the base of a basalt fault scarp, this was...
By: Lian Slayford-Wei
The Archaeology of the East Slope of Jerusalem and the Terraces of the Kidron During excavations between 1961 and 1967, the famous archaeologist Kathleen Kenyon discovered tier after tier of architectural terracing buried beneath an avalanche of stone and debris on the east slope of...
Archaeology: The Search for the land of Aratta
By: Lian Slayford-Wei
The Search for the land of Aratta Lost kingdoms are one of the fascinating topics of archaeology – lost jungle kingdoms, abandoned desert lands – they continue to fascinate and confuse us. Some, like Atlantis, carry on remaining an enigma. Where are they? Did they...
What archaeologists mean by Iconography
By: Youngbear Roth
Archaeology is wide open in regards to its deepest meaning as a science and its profound implications as a living process, and archaeology is like water – the harder you try gripping its edges to define it, the faster it slips from your palm. Amongst...
By: Elizabeth M Young
Fingerprints were used to "sign" documents as early as 1000 BC by the Babylonians and Chinese! But the science of fingerprint indentification and detection boomed in the late1800s and early 1900s. Thumb impressions were used in India to identify workers by Dr. William Herschel. Dr...
What is development anthropology?
By: Daniel Khalil
Development anthropology is a branch of anthropology that refers to the study of developing nations and the economic, social, and political issues that come up within them. Development anthropologists tend to stress the importance of listening to locals, rather than making broad generalizations that can...
By: Daniel Khalil
Political anthropology is the study of politics all the way from a stateless society to complex bureaucracies. It is a very similar discipline to Political sociology, but differentiated in terms of what relations they study. Political anthropology studies the politics associated with human society, usually...

 

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