By: Lian Slayford-Wei
Archaeology: Ritual artefacts’ from the Neolithic period at 'Ain Ghazal, Jordan The ancient site of ‘Ain Ghazal in Jordan was only recently discovered in the 1970s and has, unfortunately, has been damaged due to construction work. The Neolithic period here can be divided into...
Sunken civilizations and archaeology: Lemuria
By: Lian Slayford-Wei
Archaeology and Lemuria The quest for lost continents has been going on for well over a century; in the last few decades there have been serious archaeological excavations to find these sunken lands beneath the waves. Whilst Atlantis is perhaps the best known, the quest...
Indigenous economics and global economics: A comparison
By: Marvin Somers
Indigenous and global economics operate on entirely different scales. Indigenous economics relate the economic decisions made by individuals within their social and cultural context; global economics relates the interactions of regional and national economic bodies on international markets. The fields of indigenous and global economics...
By: Lian Slayford-Wei
Archaeology: Human burials from the Neolithic period at 'Ain Ghazal, Jordan Human remains, and the study of them, make up a big part of archaeology. Not only can we tell their genders, their physical details (such as ethnicity) and diet, but we can also learn...
By: Lian Slayford-Wei
Archaeology: Architectural remains from the Neolithic period at 'Ain Ghazal, Jordan ‘Ain Ghazal, located in the modern country of Jordan, offers some wonderful architectural remains from the Neolithic period. Whether a building is used for a family home, a community building or a religious/ceremonial...
A look at the discovery of a 12,000 year old Natufian priestess
By: Norman A. Rubin
(Dr. Leore Grosman heading a team of archeologists of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem excavating a small cave near Carmiel in the Galilee had discovered the skeleton of a woman shaman, who lived some 12,000 years ago in the Natufian of Middle Stone Age...
The fate of the Neanderthals
By: Bennett Horton Jr.
The Fate of the Neanderthals The Neanderthals (or Neandertals) can be accurately described as our closest evolutionary kin, the closest relative to modern humans. Evolutionary science being somewhat inexact, these creatures have been classified as a species distinct from Homo sapiens - Homo neanderthalensis -...
What defines a civilization?
By: Paul Rance
'Civilized' is a word often used too loosely, as can any nation truly call itself civilized - if you dig deep enough under the surface. Powerful nations and states, throughout history, have revelled in the hubris of calling themselves civilized, and those they vanquished, barbarians...
Indiana Jones
By: Kristopher Oppegaard
Stating that Indiana Jones is bad for archaeology implies that archaeology is suffering because of the existence of the character, as if there are thousands of starving archaeologists out there, and the movie series is desensitizing the public to their terrible struggle. I am not...
Archaelology: The advent of the mound builders in North America
By: Norman A. Rubin
(Large mounds of earth have existed for hundreds, perhaps even thousands of years that are found in parts of the Midwestern and Eastern United States. These mounds were built by various civilizations over a period of years, dating from the prehistoric era.) Driving at...

 

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