By: Roy C Dudgeon
Introduction to Political Economy: Modes of ProductionIntroduction:"Political economy could...be distinguished from neoclassical economics, which represented a shift in concern from the wealth of nations' to the price of beans, from value as determined by labor time to price as determined by markets" (Roseberry 1988:162)...
By: Roy C Dudgeon
Introduction to Food Procurement Systems:Food is the most basic necessity of life for any human society. The means by which a particular culture goes about acquiring food is referred to as its "food procurement system," or "subsistence system" in the anthropological literature. Cross-cultural research...
By: Roy C Dudgeon
The Anthropological Perspective: The Concept of CultureAs a social science discipline, much of what anthropology studies, and particularly cultural anthropology and archeology, is related to a core concept within the discipline of anthropology. This is the concept of "culture."But what is culture? After all...
By: Roy C Dudgeon
Why Evolution and Progress Are Not the Same Thing:The discipline of anthropology has long made use of the concept of evolution. Biological evolution, for example, is the key to understanding the origins of the human species, which is studied by physical anthropology. An understanding of...
By: Roy C Dudgeon
Trends in the Evolution of Cultural Complexity:In the anthropological literature, cultural complexity refers to both the scale of social organization and the level of technological sophistication. Anthropologists speak of more and less complex societies in order to avoid value laden terms such as "primitive" and...
By: Jean Sumner
We kiss in greeting. We blow air kisses to say farewell, or when we are too far away to lock lips. Worshipers kiss religious artifacts. Tourists visiting Ireland often stop by Blarney Castle to kiss the Blarney Stone. Parents kiss "ouchies" to make them feel...
By: Mike King
Most studies suggest that fertility rates decline in populations, human or animal, when environmental factors are hostile to further population increase or where it would not be in the organisms' interest to continue unchecked. Hostile factors include over-crowding, famine and drought, war, and diseases that...
By: Roy C Dudgeon
The Malthusian Dillema: Where Do We Stand?As most anyone knows, human population levels are a key concern when it comes to the sustainability of industrial society. The reason is simple. There are a finite amount of resources on the Earth. Each person, depending upon...
By: Roy C Dudgeon
The Demographic TransitionThe decline of fertility rates in the Western world (or more accurately, the modern industrialized countries) is referred to as "the demographic transition" in the anthropological literature (Bodley 2001; Robbins 2005). The "fertility rate" itself refers to the average number of children per...
By: Alexander Lourenco
Fieldwork is a term that refers to the "anthropologist's personal, long-term experience with a specific group of people and their way of life" (Lavenda-Schulz 5). It is anthropologists' method of choice because it is such an effective way of gathering information about a culture; by...

 

1 2 3 4 5 6 16
CHOOSE YOUR SCIENCES 360 TOPIC: