How the field of archaeology evolved
By: Colleen Mart
During the 6th century B.C., the last emperor of Babylon, Nabonidus, conducted a rudimentary form of archaeology. He traveled to the outmost edges of his empire in order to excavate and study old temples and retrieve antiquities. By studying the artifacts he attempted to...
By: Michal Dorcak
Archaeology studies historical human cultures. This is achieved through recovery, documentation, analysis and interpretation of material remains of these historical culture. A lot can be learned thanks to archaeological research. This research has three basic stages, specifically, the survey, excavation and analysis. Survey Archaeological research...
Archaeology: Finding treasures in ancient trash
By: Melissa Mcclain
Hearing the word “trash” brings about connotations of smelly, dirty, unwanted and unpleasant refuse. Just because something is trash however, does not make it useless. Archaeologists are acutely aware of this (as are “dumpster divers” and the homeless) and they are able to...
Archaeological finds and their significance along the Silk Road, Asia
By: Catlyn Foster
The Silk Road refers to the legendary caravan trails that led from Chang’an, China to Rome. None of this was a single road, but routes throughout the countryside that crisscrossed constantly as silk was exported out of China, and imported into Rome. Silk wasn&rsquo...
By: Lian Slayford-Wei
An Introduction to Buddhist Archaeology Buddhism is a religion that has millions of followers all around the world. It grew out of India sometime around the 6th century BCE from the historic person, Siddhartha Gautama. He was born in Lumbini (modern day Nepal) overlooking the...
The archaeological evidence of the existence of Atlantis
By: Silvia Dekumbis
The legend of Atlantis is shrouded in myths and dreams of various eras and cultures. It was a technically sophisticated paradise, its people peaceful and happy. Greek philosopher Plato’s stories of Atlantis’ existence and destructions have been passed from generation to generation, still leaving...
Sunken civilizations and archaeology: Lemuria
By: Silvia Dekumbis
There were once three ancient continents, presumed to have been devoured by the waves of the big oceans in the course of history: Atlantis, Mu and Lemuria. However, there are no archaeological findings, preserved writings and especially no authentic traditions that would prove their past...
The origins and future of exoarchaeology
By: Nick Ford
Brace yourself for a flight of the imagination. Exoarchaeology, sometimes known as xenoarcheology, is a hypothetical branch of archaeology that looks for the physical signs of past and present alien cultures. Although this may sound far fetched and not a subject to pursue in these...
Ulalinka: Oldest palaeolithic site in Siberia
By: Lian Slayford-Wei
Ulalinka: the Oldest Palaeolithic Site in Siberia Siberia is a land which is often overlooked in history and archaeology. This is such a shame as there are many wonderful sites and archaeological discoveries to be found. The oldest Palaeolithic site in Siberia is Ulalinka. Ulalinka...
Archaeological evidence of monkeys using hammers
By: Daniel Khalil
The word "monkey" is often tossed around a lot to mean various things, but usually to imply a "chimpanzee" or other Great Ape. Evidence for use of hammers in species prior to humans is quite evident, and humans evolved from (and still are considered) monkeys...

 

1 18 19 20 21 22 37