Archaeological sites: Eynan
By: Lian Slayford-Wei
Archaeological Sites: Eynan The archaeological site of Eynan, located in the far north of modern day Israel, provides us with a fascinating insight into the development of Epipaleolithic societies in the Levant. The name Eynan is the Hebrew version, with Mallaha or 'Ain Mallaha in...
Sunken civilizations and archaeology: Lemuria
By: James Johnson
The lost land of Lemuria reportedly sank beneath the waves thousands of years ago. Some claim it was due to evil influences while others attribute it to the shifting of Geological plates and tectonic activity. Many claim it never existed at all. Yet the founder...
Archaeology from the late Roman period in Britain
By: Arlene Miles
One of the largest and probably best known Roman era archaeological sites in Great Britain is the Chedworthvilla near Cirencester in Gloucestershire. The Chedworth villa is a typical Roman house in Britain during the late period, with U-shaped layout surrounding a central courtyard. Construction...
The history of the tombs at Mawangdui
By: Lian Slayford-Wei
The History of the Tombs at Mawangdui The tombs at Mawangdui, located in a suburb of Changsha in Hunan Province, offer us great insight into the lives and the deaths of the ancient Chinese. Three tombs have been found, containing the remains of Li Cang...
The history of Catal Hoyuk
By: Carrie Eckles
Catal Hoyuk, which means "fork mound" in Turkish, is an ancient human settlement located in southern Anatolia. The settlement was founded in Neolithic times, around 7500 BCE, and inhabited into the Copper Age. First excavated in the 1950's, it's become famous for its sheer complexity...
Archaeological sites: Ebla
By: Jess Howe
Ebla in northern Syria is a site of mystery, at which archaeologists on the dig there are constantly amazed. It's brought back interest in digging in the Middle East, with its new discoveries and amazing finds. One of these is the Royal Goddess treasure, a...
Archaeological sites: Khok Phanom Di
By: Jess Howe
Charles Higham first dug with Rachanie Thasarat at Khok Phanom Di. Located in central Thailand near the seacoast, the site was interesting to the two archaeologists because it was in a mangrove swamp. CERAMICSA large amount of pottery was found at the site, both in...
The history of Tepe Yahya
By: Jess Howe
Dr. Lambert-Karlovsky started digging at Tepe Yahya in 1965, spurred on by his interest in the works of previous archaeologists such as Sir Aurel Stein who dug near there in the 1920's. Until then archaeologists had assumed that people were only literate as far east...
Indiana Jonesgoodbad for Archaeology
By: Morton Mcinvale
As avid an Indiana Jones fan as they come (I still wear his brown fedora- courtesy of Disney world -, and listen to the John Williams theme song whenever my cell phone rings), nevertheless, I must reluctantly admit: Indiana Jones is bad for archaeology. As...
Archeological evidence suggest origins of 'first' Americans
By: Hilary Longstreet
Terrific Teeth: Dental Evidence for the Peopling of the Americas Origins The existence of the Americas and the question concerning the origins of the native inhabitants remains a fervently debated subject in American archaeology. Since the discovery of the Americas in 1492 scholars have...

 

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