How to measure a light year
By: Steven Mars
A light year is not a measure of time; it is a distance. It is used to measure how far distant objects like the stars are from the Earth. It was defined by the International Astronomical Union as the distance that light travels in a...
By: Beth Benson
Ever since the existence of solar flares has been brought to the world’s attention, scientists have been cautiously examining the threat that solar flares have on Earth’s very own existence. The actual solar flare reaching the Earth is unlikely; however it’s the...
By: Alison Bowler
Obtaining valuable treatments for infection from our natural environment is well known, after all penicillin came from a fungus. This is an overview of a study to find fungicidal agents in scorpion venom. Fungi capable of causing disease in plants, known as phytopathogenic fungi, are...
Dark matter and its implications
By: Jordin Lumsden
What is the universe made of? This is a seemingly simple question, but one might be surprised by the answer a cosmologist would give. We don't know! We can peer into the spectra of distance galaxies and stars and measure their chemical composition, and conclude...
Facts about supernovas
By: Kristin Collins
A supernova is a star that ends its life with a “massive cosmic explosion” known as supernovae, hence the name supernova. Supernovas are “rare in our own galaxy”, though many have been seen in other galaxies. The last to be seen in the...
Facts about the dwarf planet Eris
By: Kristin Collins
Eris, is the “largest dwarf planet known”. It was discovered in 2005 in a survey at California’s Palomar Observatory’s Samuel Oschin telescope by astronomers Mike Brown, Chad Trujillo, and David Rabinowitz. Originally named UBU 313, or Xena as it was nicknamed, Eris...
Types of asteroids
By: Steven Mars
An asteroid is a small body one mile to 480 miles in diameter. They revolve mostly between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. They are also called minor planets. There are thousands and thousands of them. Giuseppe Piazzi discovered the first asteroid in January, 1801...
Three types of meteors
By: Blaise Pascal
A meteor is just a scientific term for what people commonly know of as shooting stars. They are pieces of rock, minerals, silcates, metals, and dust that heat up due to the friction of the earth’s atmosphere. The friction produces the tail or streak...
Three types of meteors
By: Lara Johnson
There are three main types of meteors. Before discussing them, however, it is important to understand the difference between a meteor, a meteoroid and a meteorite. They are actually the same thing in different locations. A meteoroid is a small rock in space, usually broken...
By: Brenda Schurrer-Maro
Everyone typically takes joy from the unexpected sighting of a shooting star; however, not everyone knows exactly what they are seeing. A "shooting" or "falling" star is actually a phenomenon where a meteoroid (a particle or small piece of stony or iron matter) enters Earth's...

 

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