By: Pamela Kay
The same heavens cover urban areas that cover near-by sparsely populated areas, however; viewing those heavens from an urban area is more difficult because of light pollution. This is not to say you cannot stargaze in an urban area, only that the viewing techniques for...
By: John Traveler
When one stands at any point on the Earth and looks out toward the horizon, the perspective does not afford any notion of the curvature of its surface. Likewise, when one observes the Sun Moon and planets Mars, Jupiter and Saturn rising on the eastern...
Top astronomy books for kids
By: Deneice Arthurton
When you consider a child's natural tendency for curiosity about the world around them, combined with the enchantment that many of us feel when witnessing a bright full moon or a canopy of twinkling stars, it is no wonder that so many children become fascinated...
A guide to telescope mounts
By: Deneice Arthurton
If you are unfamiliar with telescopes you will probably be unaware that telescopes actually come in two main parts – the optical component and the mount, which is the generic term for the mechanism which supports the optics. Understanding the different types of mounts is...
An overview of the new chemical element Copernicium
By: D. Vogt
Copernicium (Cn), previously known as ununbium (Uub), is a chemical element with atomic number 112 (making it one of the highest-numbered and heaviest elements known to exist). Thus far, less than a hundred atoms of copernicium have ever been confirmed to exist following creation in...
By: Ernest Capraro
There are two main risks associated with using kitchen glassware for chemistry experiments. The first centers on the type of glass itself, and whether it is appropriate for the experiment. The second deals with the potential for cross-contamination between food and chemistry uses. As with...
By: Ernest Capraro
Just a few puffs from a helium balloon and you can sing just like “Alvin and the Chipmunks”. Whether this is a desirable goal or not, it is a fun and familiar trick for children and adults alike. Nearly everyone is familiar with the...
By: Ramona Taylor
While Helium may be the name of your favorite information and news site or a flashy line of designer eyewear, it is also the second most abundant element and listed second on the Periodic Table of the Elements, helium (He) was discovered in 1868 and...
Why your voice sounds funny after inhaling helium
By: Nigel Holmes
Take a deep breath of helium, the same gas that’s used for inflating party balloons, and you'll talk like a cartoon character. It’s an amusing effect but one with a very complicated cause. To understand why this inert gas changes the pitch of...
Resources for urban stargazers
By: Ann Laughlin
Many people, from kids to great-grandparents, enjoy stargazing. Some have driven miles to find a dark, clear sky to view those twinkling lights. Finding a spot in the country is not a rule, though, to see all the wonders of our universe. There are great...

 

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