Top chemistry projects you can do at home
By: Joan Collins
Break chemistry out of the laboratory and move it to your house. Not all chemistry experiments require the use of dangerous chemicals that have the potential to explode. In fact, many experiments are perfect for the home setting. Don goggles to protect your eyes and...
A guide to edible science projects
By: JoAnne Windsinger
Make learning about chemistry yummy and delicious by doing your own home science projects and eat the results. If you like playing with your food, these projects are perfect! These fun projects require equipment that is clean and safe. Glassware should be heatproof and not...
How to make slime
By: Joan Collins
Excite and engage your students by telling them you are going to make slime in class. This seemingly gross, nasty product is loved by kids everywhere. It is fun to make and fun to play with, regardless of the recipe you choose. Try one; try...
Chemistry experiments using household items
By: Joan Collins
Children love science, especially when they can participate in chemistry experiments. This should be cause for great joy for their parents. Be it a long weekend, vacation, snow day or home school science class, parents can guide their eager children through many exciting experiments using...
Creative ways to teach the periodic table of elements
By: M E Skeel
The secret to teaching different students to understand the Periodic Table is to match the teaching methods with their Multiple Intelligence strengths. Gardner's Multiple Intelligences theory can be a great help in teaching Science in general and the Periodic Table in particular. Basically Gardner theorised...
By: JoAnne Windsinger
Now is the perfect time to make borax snowflakes for your winter decorating. It is an inexpensive project, fun and easy for kids to do and they will enjoy watching the crystals grow on the flake. Supplies needed for each snowflake: A white pipe cleaner...
Where does helium come from?
By: Nigel Holmes
Helium is the second most abundant element in the universe. Most of it was created in the seconds after the Big Bang and is found in stars. Obviously that’s not exactly accessible, so where do we find the helium used to inflate birthday balloons...
Product reviews: Televue 15mm Plossl telescope eyepiece
By: Matt Kelly
Televue have always been known for their fine eyepieces, the head of the company Al Nagler is a keen astronomer himself, this love of astronomy is what sets Televue apart from it's rivals. Rather than just churning out eyepieces in the pursuit of profits Televue...
By: Joan Collins
Siberian chemist, Dimitri Mendeleev, was the brain behind the periodic table. In 1869, he arranged all of the elements in columns and rows, leaving gaps for elements not yet known. Today, the chart is more complete with the newest element, copernicium, being added in February...
By: Terrence Aym
Ragbir Bhathal, an astrophysicist at the University of Western Sydney claims the light pulses he detected in December 2008 is from the region of space where the extrasolar planet Gliese 581g orbits a red dwarf star.Recently, Gliese 581g was declared 100 percent certain to...

 

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