Astronaut profiles: John Young
By: D. Vogt
John Young (1930-present) was an American astronaut and engineer who flew into space first in Project Gemini, and then subsequently walked on the Moon twice as part of the Apollo project, before finishing out his space career with the first Space Shuttle flight in 1981...
Dwarf planet 2003 EL61 found in outer solar system
By: D. Vogt
Dwarf planet 2003 EL61, now known by the name Haumea (after the goddess of Hawaii), is a Kuiper Belt dwarf planet which was discovered in 2004 at a distance of 43 AU (43 times Earth's distance from the Sun), making it slightly farther out than...
Biography: Mae C. Jemison
By: D. Vogt
Mae Jemison (1956-present) is a retired American astronaut and doctor. She flew into space once aboard the Space Shuttle in 1992, becoming the first African-American woman in space. - Early Years and Career - Jemison was born to a non-profit worker and teacher in Decatur...
Astronaut profiles: Eugene Cernan
By: D. Vogt
Eugene "Gene" Cernan (1934-present) is a retired American astronaut who flew in space three times during his career with NASA: once in Project Gemini, and then again on Apollo 10 and Apollo 17. He is currently the last human being to have walked on the...
Chemistry science fair projects: Common chemicals that help melt ice
By: Ernest Capraro
Residents of colder climes are familiar with salt trucks that scatter their loads over the road after (or during) a heavy snowfall. Rock salt was historically a relatively cheap and widely available resource. Recent years have demonstrated that demand can exceed supply. Environmental concerns about...
A look at Arecibo, an astronomical observatory
By: D. Vogt
Arecibo Observatory is a distinctive, massive 305-metre (1000-foot) radio telescope located in Puerto Rico, and the largest single-dish telescope ever built. Since construction was completed in 1963, the observatory has been used to make important discoveries in radio astronomy as well as gathering radio data...
Stephen Hawking argues against the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence (SETI)
By: D. Vogt
Most critics of the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) suggest merely that it is a well-intentioned but foolish waste of money, chasing after radio signals sent by "little green men" while substantive research projects with tangible results go unfunded. However, some, like well-known Cambridge physicist...
By: D. Vogt
In 2010, Cambridge physicist Stephen Hawking made headlines by proclaiming on his documentary miniseries, Stephen Hawking's Universe, that the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) is a bad idea because it may end up attracting unwanted attention - interstellar alien travellers who will want our resources...
By: D. Vogt
In general, Earth might collide with one of three types of quite common space objects: meteoroids, asteroids, and comets. Of the three, meteoroids are actually of the least concern if they are found to be in a collision course with Earth. Meteoroids, which the International...
A guide to the sun satellite (SOHO)
By: D. Vogt
NASA's and the European Space Agency's sun satellite, the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), is a satellite launched in 1995 to study the Sun and help predict space weather. SOHO will remain operational at least until 2012, and its original mission profile has been expanded...

 

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