By: D. Vogt
The Southern Cross, or Crux, is a constellation visible throughout the southern hemisphere and the equatorial regions, which can be found between the neighbouring constellations of Centaurus and Musca. Stargazers should be careful not to confuse the Southern Cross with another similar constellation, the False...
Difference between the Swedish mil and UK mile
By: D. Vogt
Outside of the United States, the metric system is theoretically the standard system of measurements for all countries; however, nations have often informally retained a few traditional measurements. For example, Canadians still work in pounds rather than kilograms; and, in Europe, the Swedes have kept...
A brief introduction to atoms
By: D. Vogt
An atom is the smallest unit of stable matter that we speak of in normal conversation. This does not mean that it is the smallest type of matter: atoms themselves are made of smaller components, namely protons, neutrons, and electrons. However, the atom is the...
By: D. Vogt
Manganese (Mn) is the 25th chemical element on the periodic table - that is, its atoms have 25 protons in their nucleus. A naturally occurring metal, manganese is often used in industrial alloy processing and as a rust prevention tool. - Chemical Properties - Manganese...
The signifiance of capitalization in Astronomy
By: D. Vogt
Internationally, rules for when to capitalize the names of objects in astronomy are currently set by the International Astronomical Union (IAU). In general, all planets, stars, and spacecraft should be capitalized as proper nouns - a grammatical category referring to the proper names of specific...
How pulsars can affect Planet Earth
By: D. Vogt
A pulsar is a neutron star which, as it spins (having been accelerated to unbelievably rapid speeds), shoots out a continuous stream of electromagnetic radiation. From any given vantage point (for example, a telescope on Earth), these stars seem to "pulse," flickering on and...
By: D. Vogt
Mars is the fourth planet in the solar system, located in an orbit between Earth and Jupiter (this also makes it the last of the rocky planets; all more distant planets are gas giants). Viewed from Earth, Mars has a perpetually orange or reddish tinge...
The Galilean moons Of Jupiter
By: D. Vogt
The four Galilean moons of Jupiter are Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto. Although Jupiter now has 63 known moons, these four are the largest and best known, having been first discovered by Galileo Galilei in 1610. These are among the largest and heaviest moons in...
By: D. Vogt
Boron (B) is the fifth chemical on the periodic table of elements, located on the top right next to carbon. It occurs naturally in several forms, including both powders and crystals, and is a necessary nutrient for all plant species. - Chemical Composition - Boron...
Explaining the difference between physical and chemical changes
By: D. Vogt
Part of the definition of chemistry is the study of changes in matter. There are two basic types of changes which can be observed as part of chemical experiments: physical changes in substances, and chemical changes in substance. While both are significant, they are also...

 

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