Astronaut profiles: Eugene Cernan
By: D. Vogt
Eugene "Gene" Cernan (1934-present) is a retired American astronaut who flew in space three times during his career with NASA: once in Project Gemini, and then again on Apollo 10 and Apollo 17. He is currently the last human being to have walked on the...
A look at Arecibo, an astronomical observatory
By: D. Vogt
Arecibo Observatory is a distinctive, massive 305-metre (1000-foot) radio telescope located in Puerto Rico, and the largest single-dish telescope ever built. Since construction was completed in 1963, the observatory has been used to make important discoveries in radio astronomy as well as gathering radio data...
By: D. Vogt
In 2010, Cambridge physicist Stephen Hawking made headlines by proclaiming on his documentary miniseries, Stephen Hawking's Universe, that the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) is a bad idea because it may end up attracting unwanted attention - interstellar alien travellers who will want our resources...
By: D. Vogt
In general, Earth might collide with one of three types of quite common space objects: meteoroids, asteroids, and comets. Of the three, meteoroids are actually of the least concern if they are found to be in a collision course with Earth. Meteoroids, which the International...
A guide to the sun satellite (SOHO)
By: D. Vogt
NASA's and the European Space Agency's sun satellite, the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), is a satellite launched in 1995 to study the Sun and help predict space weather. SOHO will remain operational at least until 2012, and its original mission profile has been expanded...
Probablility of detecting extrasolar civilizations
By: D. Vogt
It is impossible to actually calculate the probability of detecting extrasolar civilizations, simply because too many of the variables involved are unknown. However, there are some general guidelines which can help us explain why, at the very least, detecting extrasolar civilizations has so far proved...
The Apollo 1 crew
By: D. Vogt
There is no such thing as a safe space flight: launching atop what amounts to an enormous, barely controlled explosion; flying through the near-vacuum of Earth orbit; and then plunging back to the surface with only a perilously fragile heat shield for protection. Eighteen American...
NASA's STEREO mission's role in studying coronal mass ejections on the Sun
By: D. Vogt
NASA's STEREO mission is a solar probe mission studying coronal mass ejections. The name, Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO), is a contrived acronym, referring to the fact that the mission is actually being carried out by two spacecraft, one leading the Earth in its orbit...
The Clarke Belt: Geostationary orbits above the earth
By: D. Vogt
The term Clarke Belt is an alternative and now little-used term to refer to the range of geostationary and near-geostationary orbital bands lying above the Earth's equator, in which a satellite can circle the Earth while remaining more or less directly above the same physical...
By: D. Vogt
Determining the number of stars in the sky is actually a surprisingly difficult problem, because it leads directly into a second problem: determining the size of the universe. The European Space Agency says there are between 10 sextillion and one septillion stars in the universe...

 

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