Do People only use 10 of their Brains
By: Melody Clearwater
The idea that humans use only ten percent of their brains is just a myth. This myth has several possible origins and no scientific backing to support it. In fact, the idea that humans use only ten percent of their brains is almost laughable because...
What is inositol?
By: Hans Hell
Inositol is known as a Vitamin B, more particularly Vitamin B8. Inositol is a six-fold cyclic alcohol (poly-alcohol) which has an important role in the process of cell intracellular signals. Inositol is like the other b-vitamins a member of the so-called B-complex and is part...
By: Omar Salvador
In a condition when the delicate lung tissue becomes acutely infected, there exists the lung disease known as pneumonia. The infection may be caused by several kinds of bacteria and viruses. In battling the infection, the alveoli (air sacs in the lungs) fill up with...
By: Omar Salvador
The influenza (or "flu," as it is familiarly known) outbreak of 2009, which struck hardest in Mexico, reached alert level 5, which meant it was one level short of being declared a pandemic. In the first days of the epidemic, the mass media largely...
By: Alexis Fischer
Oncogenes are found in normal cells and encode proteins involved in the control of replication, apoptosis (cell death) or both. They are involved in the normal function of the cell, but if activated can turn that cell into a cancer cell. Activation of an oncogene...
By: D. Vogt
Today, contagious illnesses are generally the result of exposure to either a virus or a bacteria. There are exceptions - malaria, for instance, is caused by a protist - but viral and bacterial infections are the most common causes of illness. Basically, what distinguishes viral...
Bone marrow: Composition and function
By: Dr Pandula Siribaddana
Overview: Bone marrow is the lifeline for cellular elements in many parts of the body including the cells present in the blood stream. The bone marrow is located in the substance of most of the bones and it is usually located in the central portion...
Diseases that are vaccine preventable
By: D. Vogt
Today, there are more vaccine-preventable diseases than ever before. These include a large number of formerly dread diseases which have been permanently eradicated (at least in developed countries) through universal vaccination programs, as well as a number of rapidly mutating viruses (like influenza, or the...
The differences between tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes
By: MKOrchard
For a cell to become cancerous, it generally must have both defective proto-oncogenes (also known as oncogenes) and defective tumor suppressor genes. The terms oncogene and tumor-suppressor gene each represent a category of genes, rather than name a specific gene. Both categories contribute to the...
Types of artificial immunity
By: D. Vogt
Artificial immunity, or artificially acquired immunity refers to immune defences against pathogens which the body has not acquired naturally. These include vaccines and, less commonly, immunoglobulin injections of antibodies. Immunity is a state achieved when the body's immune system is capable of immediately recognizing and...

 

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