Will 'hobbit' tooth yield ancient DNA?
By: Aisling Ashbery
In 2004 the scientific community was in an uproar over a tiny skeleton discovered on the island of Flores. The skeleton, which was dubbed a “hobbit” as a sort of endearing nickname, was thought to be around 18,000 years old. This year, scientists...
By: Omar Salvador
To be able to determine a person's risks for certain diseases, particularly inherited ones, scientists developed a process or method which is known today as genetic testing. This medical marvel gives an individual (and his physician) a chance to gain vital data about his genetic...
By: Gulrukh Tausif
“Smoke that cigarette and you might die faster than you think!” This is not some anti-smoking slogan trumped up to scare the tobacco users. It is in fact the findings published in Chemical Research in Toxicology, one of 38 peer-reviewed scientific journals published...
Scientists trying to clone and resurrect extinct mammoth
By: A.W. Berry
Mammoths, the extinct pre-historic elephant like beasts, may live again if a scientist in Japan successfully clones the DNA of frozen mammoth cells. The reason why Dr. Akira Iritani, the scientist leading this project, thinks the cloning is possible is because it’s been done...
How clinical genetics can improve your health
By: Effie Moore Salem
Clinical genetics, from a patient's standpoint, means that the professional team caring for a patient may be aware of a genetic possibility, and that they have the ability to apply it in diagnosing and in treatment. This is important and it will help the patient...
By: Matt Bird
DNA fingerprinting is, typically, a science relegated to humans - or so most people would believe. Found in criminal forensics shows like CSI, Dexter, Law & Order and Bones, DNA fingerprinting is, to the popular imagination, strictly used as a method of separating the good...
By: D. Vogt
Drosophila melanogaster, or the common fruit fly, has made a most uncommon contribution to modern science. Thanks to its rapid life cycle and versatile genetic code, it is one of several key model organisms used in laboratories to run multi-generational experiments on genetic manipulation and...
Caenorhabditis elegans: Genomic similarities to humans and their importance in the study of gene function
By: D. Vogt
Caenorhabditis elegans is a species of nematode, or roundworm, which grows to about 1 millimetre (less than 1/16th of an inch) long. It is one of the simplest known animals to possess a nervous system, which makes it a useful model species for standing a...
Why bedbugs are back: Gene study offers clue
By: Philip Lop
“Sleep tight and don’t let the bed bugs bite”, says the famous rhyme but anybody that has ever experienced an infestation of these creatures will know that it’s no laughing matter. Now, as many cities are starting to see a resurgence in...
The history of Drosophila melanogaster in science: How the fruit fly revolutionized genetics
By: Alicia M Prater PhD
Drosophila melanogaster, more commonly known as the fruit fly due to its common proximity to unripe or dying fruit, is commonplace in genetics courses and university labs around the globe. This small and prolific species has been a staple of genetics research for more than...

 

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