Is there scientific evidence for an intelligence gene?
By: Magda DH
There is no scientific evidence for a single intelligence gene: intelligence is too complex a phenomenon (some even argue whether such a thing as "intelligence") exists) to be controlled by a single gene, or even a simple combination of a few genes. However, there is...
By: Magda DH
Human blood groups are classified according to the presence of certain antigens on the surface of red blood cells. The greatest practical significance of blood group systems is to do with blood transfusions, and the most important divide human blood types according to the ABO...
The difference between mitochondrial DNA and nuclear DNA
By: John Traveler
On the face of it, any differences between mitochondrial (mtDNA) and nuclear (nDNA) are quite subtle and yet intriguingly blatant. Quite simply, the two substances are exactly the same stuff; nucleotides composed of the purine bases adenine and guanine paired with pyrimidine bases thymine and...
Five assumptions of the Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium
By: D. Vogt
The Hardy-Weinberg theory of genetic equilibrium predicts that changes in the frequency of genetic alleles and genotypes should result only from external disturbances, as these frequencies should otherwise exist as constants - that is, in equilibrium. (Such disturbances include selective reproduction, genetic mutation, natural selection...
Is genetic engineering ethical?
By: Daniel Mclaughlin
Great strides in science have been made in the past hundred years; more specifically, genetic engineering. Science fiction is becoming reality, and people want more. Their greediness is casting a dark shadow over the genetic engineering idea. The capabilities of genetic engineering are seemingly endless...
How genetic regulation of the angiotensin receptor influences cardiovascular disease
By: Alicia M Prater PhD
Cardiovascular disease includes coronary artery disease (including atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction), hypertension, and diabetes, to name a few. Research has found that some genes of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) are associated with these diseases. The RAS increases blood pressure and affects the constriction of the...
Genetic mutations that protect against HIV infection
By: Alicia M Prater PhD
Various ethnic populations have been of interest because of an apparent resistance to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among some individuals. Receptors on the T cells have been considered potential genetic factors in this resistance. HIV is a retrovirus spread by body fluids when they...
Is genetic engineering ethical?
By: Lucien Beauley
The World's Silent Battle Without GunsSince the very beginning of all agriculture on earth, man has been plagued with insects which have cut short our bountiful harvests. True, droughts have also been the cause of a much lowered harvest, but the farmer found they were...
Have Breakthroughs in Dna Research Led to more Harm than Good
By: John Traveler
Since DNA was first identified as the fundamental constituent of life, the science that has evolved around it has profoundly change the world and humans perspectives of themselves and all life on the planet. Over the past sixty years, a progression of breakthrough discoveries have...
The mucin genes
By: Alicia M Prater PhD
The genes encoding mucin proteins are generally designated MUC and have homologs in many species other than humans. Thanks to the Human Genome Project and the tireless work of genetic researchers, the National Library of Medicine and NCBI have a catalog of human genes, including...

 

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