The history of diabetes treatments
By: Phyllis Logie
Diabetes Mellitus has been a matter of scientific research for over a thousand years, perhaps even longer. The disease derived its name from two sources. From the Greek word for siphon came diabetes and from the Latin word for honey came Mellitus. For centuries...
Some Notes on AIDS
By: A.T. Meininger
I'll reluctantly respond with 'yes', although I don't think that describes the situation thoroughly. Let's clear out the obvious. Nature is not conscious, and cannot have intent. The title suggests intent upon nature to curtail human population. In species, it's natural that when overpopulation occurs...
Virology: What is genetic drift?
By: Janet Grischy
Viruses change rapidly. They evolve so quickly that some vaccines must be reformulated every year to remain effective. Two main factors, combined with fast growth in successful viral populations, cause viral change to be rapid. One factor is antigenic drift and one is antigenic shift...
Why bacterial respiratory infections produce yellow mucus
By: Tami Port MS
The mucus that your body secretes is there to protect you; to prevent particles that can hurt your body from getting inside. But why does it come out of you in a variety of colors?* What Is Mucus Anyway? *Mucus is secreted by all...
By: Joshua Horn - 257112
Words like epidemic and pandemic are tossed around frequently, especially with the media hype surrounding a potential avian bird flu and with the spread of the H1N1 "swine flu". However, there is a very concrete definition of a pandemic, as defined by major organizations and...
Possible health concerns with public restrooms
By: Loralie Lynn
If you're anything like me, public toilet seats gross you out. The mere thought of sitting on a public toilet seat makes me want to hold my full bladder until I get home. This isn't always a healthy idea when traveling away from home. So...
Virology: What is antigenic shift?
By: Joshua Horn - 257112
The influenza virus is well-known for its fast mutation rates, which frustrate scientists who develop vaccines and treatments. While these viruses have fast mutation rates, one of the most rapid and dangerous transformations happen in the form of something called antigenic shift. Antigenic shift occurs...
How does bacteria become resistant to antibiotics?
By: Nadine Riggs
Bacteria and How They Become Resistant to Antibiotics Bacteria are small one celled organisms that live naturally in soil, water, plants, and animals. Most bacteria are harmless as they are naturally occurring on the human body. Our skin is covered with a normal level of...
By: Connie Earl Robertson
The thyroid gland is a small gland, normally weighing less than one ounce that is located at the base of the voice box. It is part of the endocrine system. Its basic job is to take iodine from the foods a person eats and convert...
How does bacteria become resistant to antibiotics?
By: Tami Port MS
Shortly after antibiotics were first mass produced for the general public, the microbes that they were designed to kill began to fight back. Since that time, many pathogenic microbes (those that cause disease) have become resistant to drug therapy. But what exactly is antibiotic resistance...

 

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