Estradiol's role in the human body
By: Eileen Eva
Estradiol also known as E2, oestradiol or 17β-estradiol is a naturally occurring hormone synthesized in large quantities in women and low amounts in men. In women, it is the predominant sex hormone while in men it is formed as an active metabolic product of...
How skin protects the body from infection
By: Chelsea Padget
Skin, part of the Integumentary system, is the largest organ in the body. If stretched out flat, skin would measure about 20 feet. The skin weighs about seven to ten pounds. Skin covers the whole body, with the exception of the eyes, and acts as...
How your brain picks just the right move
By: Gene Patterson
Is game play expertise hardwired? Maybe you have seen video games played and marveled at how fast the reactions times can sometimes be. Maybe you have played these games yourself and wondered how you are able to make the “right” move sometimes before you...
The anatomy of the human nervous system
By: Kat Centeno
The human nervous system consists of two groups: the central nervous system and the peripheral nervous system. The central nervous system consists of the brain and the spinal cord. It is the control center of all human functions. It is where the responses to stimuli...
Function of the stomach
By: Caroline Fynn
The stomach forms the widest part of the digestive tract and contains three basic sections. The upper part is known as the fundus, the main and largest portion is referred to as the stomach body and the lower section as the pyloric antrum. Three layers...
An overview of ligaments found at the elbow joint
By: Christa Martin
The elbow is a hinge joint. This means that the operation principle of a door hinge is based on this naturally-occurring example. The elbow allows the arm to bend at the halfway point in a bi-directional arc encompassing about 150 degrees. The way in which...
Structures conveying flexibility and vulnerability of the human neck
By: Alicia M Prater PhD
Flexibility of the neck is important for humans’ ability to observe their environment, but this ability also makes it a vulnerable structure. Within the neck are major blood vessels and nerves that connect the brain to all structures below the head, including the heart and...
Why we yawn
By: Maya Vokes-Didier
Yawning is an involuntary action that is commonly associated with fatigue, boredom or tiredness, and is quite common among most living creatures, including snakes, primates and carnivores. In human beings, yawning is considered to be a very purposeful non-verbal signal, and folklore has many superstitions...
An overview of muscles in the neck
By: Effie Moore Salem
To get an accurate picture of the neck muscles, it is best to first identify them according to their action, and determine what they push or pull and where they are located. The *Sternocleidomastoid muscle is the one used to move the head from side...
The functions of red blood cells
By: Oliver Gray
Red blood cells (erythrocytes - from Greek erythros for ‘red’ and kytos for ‘hollow’, with cyte translated as ‘cell’ in modern terms) are made in the bone marrow in a process called haematopoiesis where they lose their nucleus, as a child all...

 

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