Synovial joints: Structure and function
By: Alicia M Prater PhD
The skeletal system consists of bones joined together at joints. Most of the joints in the human body articulate; that is, they are capable of movement. Also known as diarthroses, the synovial joints consist of various types of connective tissue that hold and cushion the...
Function of heart ventricles
By: Clare Yap - 500984
The heart is arguably the most important organ in a person's body. Indeed, it is the first organ to start working - the human heart starts beating 21 days after conception. Without the heart transporting blood around the body, tissues and cells would be unable...
How human hormones control the body
By: Bob Lloyd
Hormones are remarkable biological chemicals which can act as messengers to get the target tissue to react in a specific way. A very small amount of a hormone can initiate changes in tissue and they are found in all biological organisms more complex than a...
Ligaments: Structure and function
By: Ben Herd
Ligaments are one of those problematic body parts that people often confuse for something else, such as tendons. This may be because both ligaments and tendons are connective tissues, but whereas tendons connect muscles to bone, ligaments are what join one bone to another at...
Tendons: Structure and function
By: Ben Herd
It is all very well having muscles all over our body to produce strength for movement, but without a means to apply the strength of our muscles to our skeletons, muscles would just be useless excess weight. The muscles are attached to our skeletons however...
Factors that affect kidney function
By: Dr Pandula Siribaddana
Overview of the kidneys: Kidneys are one of the vital organs in our body and its functional disruption can even cause death by deranging many metabolic functions and secondarily affecting other vital organs. There are many factors which can influence the kidney functions and these...
An overview of angiogenesis
By: Dr Pandula Siribaddana
Angiogenesis is the term used to describe the process in which cells in the blood vessel walls degenerate, proliferate and re-arrange to form new blood vessels and these processes mainly take place at the level of capillaries. Although this is a general explanation of the...
The differences between acquired and innate immunity
By: Dr Pandula Siribaddana
Immunity is a term we used to describe the body’s ability to fight against invading organisms as well as for reactions within the body itself. Vaccination programmes world wide are implemented in hope of developing the immune system or making them aware regarding a...
Structure of the nephron: The basic unit of the kidney
By: Dr Pandula Siribaddana
Overview: Nephron is the basic functional unit of the human kidney and a single kidney is made out of 800,000 to 1 million nephrons. These nephrons perform many functions and these include regulating the blood volume, blood pressure, metabolic status and more importantly electrolyte...
By: Janet Grischy
The metabolism of the human body is the mechanism that turns food energy into fuel and then turns the fuel into the building blocks of cells as well as into the energy the body uses. People who are trying to gain or lose weight are...

 

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