Explaining blood formation in the human body
By: Jeff Casto
Blood is composed of red cells, white cells, platelets, and a number of other substances such as clotting factors, electrolytes, proteins, and hormones, all floating around in a liquid called plasma. The main constituent of blood is the red blood cell, or erythrocyte. In a...
Muscle vs. fat explained
By: Loa Blasucci
Weighing in Do you remember that old riddle we heard back in the fifth grade, "What weighs more, a pound of feathers or a pound of rocks?" Your first inclination may have been that of course, rocks are heavier than feathers. But, the real...
The functions of red blood cells
By: Yunfei Han
Erythrocyte and usErythrocytes are also known as red blood cells (RBCs). They are cells normally found in animals and are highly specialised in transport of oxygen and carbon dioxide. Due to the differences and the complexities between the many types of erythrocytes, in the interest...
Basic functions of the human eye
By: W.H. Garcia
The eye's basic function is to catch and focus light onto the back of the eye, where there are sensory receptors to convert the light energy to neural signals which are relayed to the brain, allowing us to interpret images.The visible spectrumBecause of the...
Overview of the human thermoregulatory system
By: W.H. Garcia
Humans, being warm-blooded, have the innate ability to regulate the body temperature according to a fixed set point. That set point is usually 36.7 degrees Celsius for a normal healthy person.The thermoregulatory system is controlled by the hypothalamus in the brain, which operates...
Bodies at rest: What happens when people sleep
By: Cheryl Macdonald
During recent times a lot of focus has gone into researching sleep mostly due to the number of sleeping disorders that are being diagnosed. According to ancient myths, sleepers lose control of their minds, flirting with death as their souls wonder freely. Early researchers thought...
Bodies at rest: What happens when people sleep
By: Nancy Houser
Most individuals require seven to nine hours of sleep per night, with teenagers requiring no less than nine hours. The majority of people are over 80% sleep deprived, with symptoms of increasingly irritable, shorter attention span, shorter learning ability, increase in accidents, blood pressure problems...
Bodies at rest: What happens when people sleep
By: Perry McCarney
The physical side of what occurs when we sleep is comparatively easy to understand. Although the specifics of what occurs at a molecular level is not fully known, the general physiological circumstances are understood. Our bodies slow down or suspend their aware-state responsive activities and...
Bodies at rest: What happens when people sleep
By: Marla Hansen
Sleep is not only about rest. Sleep is about survival. That's correct, without enough sleep you die. This has been proven through studies although scientists aren't exactly sure why. Most of us need between seven and eight hours of sleep each night. Without those all...
Bodies at rest: What happens when people sleep
By: Stanley Roberts
Biological cycles within our bodies that occur on an approximate 24 hour cycle are known as circadian rhythms. Circadian rhythms promote a readiness for sleep by decreasing alertness but they do not regulate sleep. Instead about every 90 minutes while asleep our body cycles through...

 

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