By: Kimberly Napier
Estuaries are bio-diverse ecosystems. They provide nutrients to native plants and animals, as well as a habitat for many of these. They also are filters for some pollution that may travel down rivers. There are several different types of estuaries, with excellent examples to check...
What is coral bleaching?
By: Jose Juan Gutierrez
Coral bleaching refers to a condition that affects corals due to changing conditions in its environment. Coral bleaching is usually caused by climatic stressors stemming from anthropogenic or natural factors in the reef ecosystem, such as changing water temperatures, variations in sunlight, changes in ocean...
By: Dr Pandula Siribaddana
According to estimates, around 600 million people worldwide live in coastal areas that are less than 10 meters above the sea level, while around two-thirds of the world cities that have a population of more than 5 million each are also located in similar areas...
Understanding the water cycle
By: Jose Juan Gutierrez
The water cycle is the continuous distribution of water on the global Earth. Water moves dynamically along Earth's water reservoirs, such as rivers, lakes, oceans and atmosphere, by processes, including condensation, evaporation, precipitation, runoff and filtration. In this dynamic movement, water changes states from a...
The differences between a pond and a lake
By: Retha Boswell
Limnology, or the study of inland waters, has attempted to explain the difference between lakes and ponds for centuries. From legal and regulatory standpoints, ponds and lakes are viewed and treated the same way. Surprisingly, there is no precise definition for naming a pond versus...
By: Steven J. Wamback
Plate Tectonics is the process by which the series of tectonic plates, into which the entire surface crust of the Earth is divided, slowly moves about due to the convective forces of heat rising up to the surface from the Earth’s core and then...
Instruments commonly used in oceanography
By: Retha Boswell
Oceanography, or marine science, is the study of the ocean. Oceanographers use many different types of equipment for their research. Some common oceanographic instruments are a CTD, sediment trap, and incubator. These are the three pieces of equipment that evert oceanographic vessel should have on...
How the Challenger Expedition shaped the science of oceanography
By: Retha Boswell
The turning point of modern oceanography occurred between 1872 and 1876 when the HMS Challenger set sail for the sole purpose of exploring the world’s oceans. The Challenger Expedition sought to collect data on ocean temperatures, water chemistry, currents, marine life, and the seafloor...
How the Challenger Expedition shaped the science of oceanography
By: Jose Juan Gutierrez
The Challenger expedition was one of the first scientific expeditions intended to gather data about the ocean's unexplored features. During the expedition which lasted from 1872-1876, the scientific crew gathered data on the temperature, water chemistry, currents, marine organisms and ocean floor deposits. The Challenger...
How the Challenger Expedition shaped the science of oceanography
By: Kimberly Napier
Oceanography is the study of the Earth's oceans and the boundaries. This waterway, which is interconnected cover over 70 percent of the earth's surface. Humans have always had a close tie to the oceans. We use it for food and a way to predict weather...

 

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