By: Lea Miller
Coral reefs are structures built by millions of tiny organisms that create an environment favorable to the thousands of varieties of fish and other sea creatures that make their home on the reef. The reef structure builds up over time as individual coral polyps die...
By: Janet Grischy
As Oregon moves to zone the ocean off its coast, it must balance competing interests and conflicting uses. It is not the first government body to attempt to plan for the future of its territorial waters. The United Kingdom, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island have been...
By: Elizabeth M Young
Intertidal organisms must adapt to a variety of conditions that are very threatening to life where land meets sea. The intertidal zone is a very harsh environment for three reasons, the violence of wave action, rapidly changing environmental conditions, and changes in salinity and other...
By: Jeremiah Akhirevbulu
Plankton are microscopic or macroscopic organisms of plant and animal origin found in the pelagic region of water bodies where sunlight penetration and nutrient availability are abundant. Plankton are defined based on the ecological niche they occupy rather than their phylogenetic or taxonomic classification. Plankton...
By: J. Lang Wood
The word plankton comes from the Greek word planktos, meaning “wanderers.” The name describes the ability of plankton to move on ocean currents. This motion is how plankton get from place to place where it can be used as a food source by...
By: Michael Totten
The idea of zoning U.S. territorial waters is not new. Ocean zoning, a central component of marine spatial planning, is the next logical step from simply setting aside marine protected areas. Coastal and marine spatial planning, together with ecosystem-based management, are among the National...
By: Michael Totten
Most tsunamis are associated with subduction earthquakes along the Pacific Ring of Fire, and to a lesser extent with earthquakes along the edges of continental plates in the Indian Ocean. However, the Atlantic Ocean is also vulnerable to tsunamis. Causes All tsunamis are caused by...
By: Blaise Pascal
One of the primary methods of survival for any organism is adaptation. Intertidal organisms are no different. These organisms specifically inhabit the area or zone between high and low tide along rocky coasts, sandy beaches or tidal wetlands/marshes. Some examples of these organisms include: hermit...
By: Julie Thomas-Zucker
The biological composition of the Arctic and Antarctic seas shows very unique properties in recent days. The seas have very, very low temperatures and little or no sunlight. The water is acidic with hydrogen sulfide with low levels of chloride. The high acid is usually...
By: Shannon Farlouis
A tsunami is also called a harbor wave. A tsunami is usually caused by a major disturbance like an earthquake, underwater explosions or volcanic eruptions. A tsunami is quite similar to a rapidly rising tide. They have a very long wave length and they rise...

 

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