By: Dr Pandula Siribaddana
According to estimates, around 600 million people worldwide live in coastal areas that are less than 10 meters above the sea level, while around two-thirds of the world cities that have a population of more than 5 million each are also located in similar areas...
By: Heather Brennan
Most people associate earthquakes with the west coast and the San Andreas Fault. However, the New Madrid Fault Line is actually 20 times larger than the San Andreas Fault and the potential damage it can cause is significantly higher. If geologists are reading the signs...
What is the ionosphere?
By: Jose Juan Gutierrez
The ionosphere is an electrified region in the upper atmosphere where large quantities of free electrons, charged atoms and molecules exist. The ionosphere lies in a region 60-1000 km (37-621 miles) and beyond the atmosphere and is entirely ionized by the radiation coming from the...
Understanding the water cycle
By: Jose Juan Gutierrez
The water cycle is the continuous distribution of water on the global Earth. Water moves dynamically along Earth's water reservoirs, such as rivers, lakes, oceans and atmosphere, by processes, including condensation, evaporation, precipitation, runoff and filtration. In this dynamic movement, water changes states from a...
The differences between a pond and a lake
By: Retha Boswell
Limnology, or the study of inland waters, has attempted to explain the difference between lakes and ponds for centuries. From legal and regulatory standpoints, ponds and lakes are viewed and treated the same way. Surprisingly, there is no precise definition for naming a pond versus...
By: Steven J. Wamback
Plate Tectonics is the process by which the series of tectonic plates, into which the entire surface crust of the Earth is divided, slowly moves about due to the convective forces of heat rising up to the surface from the Earth’s core and then...
How oceans affect Earth's climate
By: Jose Juan Gutierrez
The oceans of the world comprise approximately 3/4 of the Earth's surface, thus, the oceans absorb most of the radiation energy coming from the Sun compared to what the land's surface does. Solar radiation is absorbed by land masses, the air and the ocean at...
By: Robin Lamb
The Sahara Desert might appear to be an unlikely place to be looking for evidence of an ice age. It’s one of the hottest and driest locations on the planet; a desolate wasteland which covers an area larger than Australia and which is estimated...
Exploring claims that many scientists do not believe in climate change
By: Christyl Rivers
Climate Science has been under siege for more than two decades now. But what is the source of this relentless claim that scientists, primarily climatologists, are wrong about the climate crisis? Claims are made daily that many other scientists dispute that the climate has gotten...
Instruments commonly used in oceanography
By: Retha Boswell
Oceanography, or marine science, is the study of the ocean. Oceanographers use many different types of equipment for their research. Some common oceanographic instruments are a CTD, sediment trap, and incubator. These are the three pieces of equipment that evert oceanographic vessel should have on...

 

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