By: B. J. Deming
In the middle of the afternoon on March 11, 2011, one of the walls in a deep ocean trench just off the northeastern shore of Honshu, Japan, suddenly snapped. A piece of the sea floor about 186 miles long by 93 miles wide, per the...
By: Stanley Courage Duoghah
In oceanography or the study of the oceans, tides refer to the rise and fall of sea levels. A situation which is brought about by two things: the gravitational forces exerted by the sun and the moon and the rotation of the earth, which has...
By: Stanley Courage Duoghah
Water, which is the most abundant natural resource, is a binary compound made up of countless molecules, which can be explained as particles or tiny bits that come together to constitute chemical elements and certain compounds, in this case water. A water molecule may exist...
A guide to ocean habitats
By: Cicely Richard
Ocean habitats describe the five major bodies of water – the Pacific, the Atlantic, the Indian, the Arctic and the Southern oceans – that cover 71 percent of the Earth's surface. The largest habitat on the planet contains 97 percent of the Earth's water and...
By: Stanley Courage Duoghah
Also referred to as seaquakes, underwater earthquakes occur beneath or at the bottom of water bodies, most especially oceans as the name suggests. Those that occur beneath oceans to trigger tsunamis are also identified as seaquakes. Unlike normal earthquakes, which can result from movements inside...
Chemical structure of seawater
By: Nick Ford
There are many minerals in seawater. Seawater contains dissolved salts, dissolved gases and particulate matter. Almost every element is represented to some degree. The practice of extracting salt from sea water by evaporation is very ancient. In France the Fleur de Sel is a highly...
By: Stanley Courage Duoghah
In oceanography-the study of the oceans, the phrase "chemical structure" is used in reference to the chemical composites or particles that make up and are responsible for peculiar features and certain characteristics associated with seawater. Put in other words, seawater may look slightly blue from...
By: Nick Ford
The rise and fall in the sea level is familiar to anyone who has taken a vacation in a coastal resort. The holidaymaker probably knows that they are caused by the orbit of the moon around the earth. An intelligent tourist probably realises that the...
By: Cicely Richard
Tides refer to the rise and fall of sea levels caused by the gravitational pull of the sun and moon coupled with the Earth's rotation. Because the moon is closer to the Earth than the sun, it has a stronger affect on tides. The Office...
By: Michael Totten
The Antarctic glaciers are melting faster than ever before. In fact, the rate of melting in some glaciers is twice as fast as it was just 15 years ago. Part of the reason for this is that Antarctic shelf ice, which is the part of...

 

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