By: Elizabeth M Young
The Earth contains several biomes, each with temperature ranges, presence and depth of water, freshness or brackishness of water, annual rainfall, presence or absence of sunlight, flora and fauna which thrive in specific environments. Biomes can be classified in terms of their landed and aquatic...
By: Marisol Dayton
“Fuji alone Left uncovered by The new leaves.” Kyoto poet-painter Buson wrote those lines about Mount Fuji. A well-known symbol of Japan, Mount Fuji rises over 12,000 feet in a nearly symmetrical cone, snow-capped, gentle slopes rolling away to the countryside. Mount...
By: Tim Harry
There is often some dispute about which of Scotland’s glens is actually the longest. A glen is normally described as a U-shaped valley, a long, deep valley that often has or had a river running along its length. The front runner for the title...
By: Jeff Parsons
Earthquake ! ! ! The ground suddenly moves, readjusts, resettles, and then, later on, moves again…all a part of the planet’s shifting plate tectonics. An earthquake is a terrifying and destructive tragedy, but, aftershocks, the shocks that reoccur many times afterward, can be far more dangerous...
Difference between lava and magma
By: Hai Shunxi
The words "lava" and "magma" both refer to molten rock that has been melted by the extreme temperatures miles below the earth's surface. When it's underground, liquid rock is called "magma." If this red-hot liquid make its way to the earth's surface and flows...
Why is drinking sea water dangerous?
By: Judith Willson
Drinking a little bit of seawater is not actually particularly dangerous in itself. If you have ever been swimming in the ocean you are bound to have accidentally done this and you are still here. However you cannot hydrate by drinking seawater, and in fact...
By: J. van der Gaag
When scientists study volcanic eruptions, one of the challenges they face is how to compare different events, past and present, in a meaningful way. One of the tools developed to address this challenge is the Volcanic Explosivity Index (VEI), created in 1982 by Chris Hewhall...
A guide to using the Volcanic Explosivity Index (VEI)
By: Marisol Dayton
Not all volcanoes are created equal. Nor do they erupt equally. As hurricanes have the Saffir-Sampson scale, tornadoes have the Fujita scale, and earthquakes have the Richter scale, volcanoes have the Volcanic Explosivity Index. The VEI was first proposed in 1982 by Christopher Newhall and...
By: Michael Fassbender
People are often at a loss to describe the power of a volcanic eruption. When earthquakes are discussed, the classification of the Richter Scale comes readily to the public at large. News reports can even offer this information in shorthand, saying that a given tremor...
By: Michael Fassbender
It is the classic image of a volcano: a tall mountain that looms over the surrounding countryside, growing progressively steeper as one approaches the summit. There, a large crater marks the spot from which past eruptions have issued. In erupting, the stratovolcano suits the popular...

 

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