By: Eve Redstone
The Beaufort wind scale is a measure of the speed or force of a wind and is widely used on land and at sea. Knowing the strength of approaching winds is obviously important for many reasons. Advance warning of oncoming storms allows for preparation, but...
By: Tammy L Mahan
The anatomy of a hurricane is fascinating, while a hurricane is only made of three parts and one part actually poses little to no danger at all the combination of the two remaining parts working together create one of Mother Natures biggest furies! A hurricane...
By: Eve Redstone
In 1938 a junior meteorologist called Charlie Pierce at the United States Weather Bureau warned his superiors that there was a hurricane on its way to Long Island. The chief forecaster over ruled Charlie, and the hurricane that became known as The Long Island Express...
By: Tammy L Mahan
Tropical storms and hurricanes have been named in some countries since the 1800's. Others started naming the storms in early 1930's but it wasn't until the mid 1950's that a "real" system was set in to motion by all the countries that are prone to...
By: Eve Redstone
A storm surge is a flood of high water, caused by wind and low pressure pushing water on shore from the ocean. The most spectacular and damaging examples of this occur during storm events such as hurricanes or cyclones. It is the storm surge that...
By: Suzie Jane
Sir Francis Beaufort was the person who created the Beaufort Wind Scale while he was a Commander in the British Royal Navy in 1806. This scale had 0 to 12 scale categories that indicated how much a ship's sail would be employed by the wind...
By: W D Adkins
Ever since the 1800s farmers in the Midwestern United States have called hailstorms "the white plague." And no wonder! In just a few minutes hail can devastate a farmer's crop. The origin of the term is uncertain. It may be a Biblical reference to...
By: M. Cotton
The Great MistakeOn September 21, 1938 the official forecast for Long Island and the New England area was for cloudy skies and gusty conditions. By 3:30 PM an enormous hurricane struck with 30-50 foot waves, 14-25 foot storm tides, and winds gusting over 180 mph...
By: Tarot
Storm surges are triggered by a combination of two or three mechanisms; the primary factors are wind speed and the geography of the area but a secondary contributory factor is pressure though this is not necessarily as important as is sometimes thought.Wind creates waves...
By: Suzie Jane
How does the Earth's spin affect weather? If the earth did not spin, have a tilt on the axis and have water, the air would heat up from the sun and rise causing it to move towards the poles where it would be cooled and...

 

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