By: Candy Spilman
Like many scientists over the years, Alfred Wegener died before his controversial assumption was accepted as fact throughout the world. Wegener, who was born in Berlin on November 1, 1880, was known as the most ardent supporter for the Continental Drift Theory. Although he was...
By: Cynthia Astle
For a supposedly "peaceful" ocean, the Pacific Rim harbors some of the world's busiest geological features, including volcanoes and earthquakes. Also known as the "Ring of Fire," the geological features of this region around the Pacific Ocean give scientists insights into the seething cauldron...
Alert level raised for Mexico's Popocatepetl volcano
By: Leigh Goessl
Mexico's Popocatepetl volcano continues to show increased signs of awakening this month. On May 8, 2013 the volcano began to spew ash during a series of ongoing small eruptions after becoming more active over the past month. After approximately eight hours of small eruptions and...
Lava flows and ash spews detected at Alaska's Cleveland and Pavlof volcanoes
By: Leigh Goessl
Two Alaskan volcanoes are seeing increased activity as levels of ash, lava spews and rumblings pick up in frequency. Notable amplified seismic activity has been documented at both the Cleveland and Pavlof volcanoes. While experts are having a difficult time observing the two volcanoes due...
By: Robin Lamb
A pocket of ancient water discovered in the depths of a Canadian goldmine may provide vital clues about the way life evolved on Earth. Scientists from universities in Britain and Canada say that the water is at least 1.5 billion years old - and...
By: Retha Boswell
Antarctica is covered by a 1.6 kilometer (1 mile) deep sheet of ice, but not quite all of it. The McMurdo Dry Valleys form an unusual region, resembling the surface of Mars. The ice-free valleys stand out with striking contrast to the surrounding ice...
By: Vonda J. Sines
To many people, the Grand Canyon is a breathtaking spot to visit on vacation. For Colorado River enthusiasts, it’s nature at its most ferocious. Geologists are in love with it. This attraction has been so popular that in 1997, it became one of the...
By: D. Vogt
Meteor strikes are one of the most surprising causes of diamond formation on the surface of the Earth. Most sources of diamonds today were formed by the geological processes of the Earth itself, and meteorites sometimes carry small quantities of tiny diamonds to Earth from...
Understanding how limestone caves are made
By: Trenna Sue Hiler
A cave is an opening in the earth, large enough for a man to get into. To be a true cave it needs to expand beyond the reach of natural light. The study of caves is called speleology. In order to truly understand this science...
How a meteor strike can create diamonds
By: Mac Pike
The far reaches of Siberia are famous for the numbers of meteors which they seem to attract. Many know about the famed “Tunguska event” of June 30th, 1908, which leveled hundreds of square miles of forest, killed thousands of deer, broke windows 50 miles...

 

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