How petrified wood is formed
By: Stephany Mccann
Petrified wood is a form of fossilized plant, often trees, which is created both naturally and in labs. Samples are typically millions of years old, and formed due to nearby volcanoes which supplied the ash and silica needed for petrification. One of the largest collections...
Origins and purpose of the Nazca Lines of Peru
By: T. Scott Randolph
There is a place in the high deserts of Peru, it has become known as the Nazca Lines. The unique geology of the area makes it so that figures that are carved out of the land will show up beautifully against the rest of the...
By: Jose Juan Gutierrez
The layers of the Earth are formed by a process known as planetary differentiation, which consists of the separation of its distinct components based on its chemical characteristics. In this process, the denser material descends to the center, while the lighter material accrues at the...
Layers of the earth
By: Steve Satria
Geophysical studies have revealed that the interior of the Earth is comprised of multiple layers, just like the exterior. These layers, more commonly known as structures, of the earth can be defined in two ways, chemically and mechanically. Chemically, the layers can be divided into...
By: Jose Juan Gutierrez
Geologists know that the center of the Earth is composed of various concentric layers of rock with distinct physical characteristics. The way in which they have discovered this is through the study of earthquakes. The observation of seismic wave changes reveals the positions of the...
Layers of the earth
By: Mike Mwendwa
The earth has an equatorial diameter that is approximately 7,900 miles long. It is the largest of the of the four known terrestrial planets, i.e. planets that are composed of rock material and the only planet which can support life. The other terrestrial...
By: Elizabeth M Young
The Pacific Ocean host a vast arrangement of volcanic structures that are called the "Ring of Fire". This massive arc of volcanoes begins in New Zealand, curves west to hug Oceania and the Asian continent, then swings northeastward to the North American continent. The ring...
By: James Vigh
There is growing concern among scientists and Volcanologists (not to mention civilian populations) about the heavy population density that surrounds a great many active and dormant volcanoes throughout the world. These same scientists and Volcanologists are laboring mightily in their attempts on accurately predicting volcanic...
How the earth's core was formed
By: Effie Moore Salem
It's almost impossible to know the precise ways in which the core of the earth was formed but technology give us many clues. Many unanswered questions remain about what is at the center of the earth and what holds it together. While the question is...
By: Jose Juan Gutierrez
Scientists who study earthquakes are called seismologists. By analyzing a seismograph, seismologists can tell the strength and distance of the earthquake; however, to find the epicenter, at least two other seismograph readings for the same earthquake are necessary. A seismograph is an instrument that registers...

 

1 74 75 76 77 78 93