By: Tim Harry
The earth is changing, with less ice present at the poles, and less water in many of the world's largest lakes. Whether this change is a natural event or man made is something that is often debated, although the fact that change is occurring is...
What geologists do
By: Guy Allen
Geology and the Work of Geologists Geology is the study of the Earth. The study can further be subdivided into physical geology and historical geology. Physical geology is concerned with the earth materials, surface and interior changes, and the forces involved. Historical geology considers the...
An overview on earthquake aftershocks
By: W. S. Gibson
Since the traumatizing major (magnitude 7) earthquake that struck near Port-au-Prince, Haiti, on January 12, 2010, the residents of that Caribbean country have experienced the fright of a sequence of aftershocks—the smaller earthquakes or tremors that follow a major earthquake. The Relationship Between Earthquakes...
How to prepare for an earthquake
By: Lisa Van Dam
In light of what has happened in Haiti, we can all see how devastating an earthquake can be. You may be asking yourself, "How do I get prepared for a quake if I don't know that it's coming? There are some steps that you can...
What are stratovolcanoes?
By: Colleen Mart
Some of the most familiar stratovolcanos in the world are Mount Fuji, Mount Vesuvius, Mount Krakatoa, Mount Tambora and Mount Pinatubo. On the North American continent there are several stratovolcanos, Mount Shasta, Mount St. Helens, Mount Hood and Mount Rainier. Each of these volcanoes is...
How old is the earth?
By: Guy Allen
Age, Structure and Composition of the Earth Geology is the study of the Earth, its rocks and minerals and the dynamic processes involving their formation and change. Geological events affect us all to a greater or lesser extent even if they occur halfway around the...
A guide to using the Volcanic Explosivity Index (VEI)
By: George Leard
A guide to using the Volcanic Explosivity Index (VEI) The concept of providing a relative measure of the explosiveness of a volcano, was developed and implemented by Chris Newhall of the US Geological Survey, and Steve Self of the University of Hawaii in 1982. The...
By: Marisol Dayton
“Fuji alone Left uncovered by The new leaves.” Kyoto poet-painter Buson wrote those lines about Mount Fuji. A well-known symbol of Japan, Mount Fuji rises over 12,000 feet in a nearly symmetrical cone, snow-capped, gentle slopes rolling away to the countryside. Mount...
By: Jeff Parsons
Earthquake ! ! ! The ground suddenly moves, readjusts, resettles, and then, later on, moves again…all a part of the planet’s shifting plate tectonics. An earthquake is a terrifying and destructive tragedy, but, aftershocks, the shocks that reoccur many times afterward, can be far more dangerous...
Difference between lava and magma
By: Hai Shunxi
The words "lava" and "magma" both refer to molten rock that has been melted by the extreme temperatures miles below the earth's surface. When it's underground, liquid rock is called "magma." If this red-hot liquid make its way to the earth's surface and flows...

 

1 38 39 40 41 42 93