By: Mark Hopkins
Most people are familiar with the notion that thunderstorms occur due to extreme convection, rapidly rising columns of air which produce cumulonimbus, anvil shaped, clouds which can reach a height of 10,000 meters. Often, the heating of the land by the summer sun is...
By: Kallie Szczepanski
A quirk of geology makes the Midwestern United States a perfect spawning ground for powerful tornados. The unique arrangement of North America's mountain ranges creates the world's most prolific source of severe weather, commonly known as "Tornado Alley."Most of the continents on Earth have...
By: Debra Steele
A hurricane is one type of a tropical storm that is a circulation of winds that form on the surface of a body of water accompanied by thunderstorms. There must be a surface temperature greater than 80 degrees, and a little wind shear has to...
By: Meg A Wright
The power and destruction of one hurricane is enough to cripple a large city. But imagine what the effect of two hurricanes rotating as one would be. This is the phenomenon called the Fujiwhara effect.Best described as a stormy waltz, Dr. Sakuhei Fujiwhara wrote...
By: Kallie Szczepanski
If you live in the Midwestern United States, you've probably seen them: towering cumulonimbus anvil clouds rising into a sky colored with the palette of bruised skin- sickly green, purple, or orange-brown. One glance at these phenomena is enough to tell any observer: tornado weather...
By: Shawna Blake
Dark, looming clouds sweeping across the sky, threatening to burst. With this, they will unleash a torrent of heavy rain and booming thunder laced with electrical streaks of lightening. Thunder storms are a normal occurrence, especially in the early fall, and during the late spring...
By: Laurie Childree
Names are given to tropical storms when they reach a wind speed of thirty-nine miles per hour because there can be more than one at a time it helps weather forecasters to differentiate between them. The National Hurricane Center has six lists from which names...
By: Richard L. Isaacs
The Beaufort Wind Force Scale, or Beaufort Scale for short, is a standardized method of estimating and reporting wind speed. By observing the visible effects of the wind upon the open sea surface or land objects, a person can determine the approximate wind speed. Once...
By: Douglas Black
Have you ever watched one of those apocalyptic movies where suddenly, the sky turns black, and a thick rolling cloud wall rips apart unleashing the ominous four horsemen. To a storm chaser or a meteorologist, it’s a rather fitting description of the awesome formation...
By: Ben Kritz
The "White Plague" that people have been familiar with for centuries is actually a vernacular term for tuberculosis, but borrowing it to describe the unpleasant effects of a hail storm might be appropriate. Hail does not kill as many people as tuberculosis, but it does...

 

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