By: L.S. Watts
The earth’s main energy source comes from the sun. It provides the earth with not only light but also warmth. Without the sun, Earth would be a cold and lifeless planet. But how exactly is the sun’s energy transferred to the earth? Radiation...
By: Dr Pandula Siribaddana
In the year 1859, scientists Richard Carrington and Richard Hodgson observed and reported a large flare on the surface of the sun. Although the reason and the nature of the observation was not apparent at that moment, it became known as a ‘solar flare&rsquo...
By: Keith Redfern
Fog is caused when water vapour in the atmosphere condenses into water droplets. Essentially fog is cloud at ground level. According to the International Meteorological Code, fog is a visibility of less than 1 km, and in the UK a thick fog represents a visibility...
What is a solar flare
By: Louis Spector
What is a Solar Flare? Here’s a quick and easy to understand definition of what a solar flare is. Magnetic energy builds up in the solar atmosphere. Once this pent up energy reaches a certain level it can no longer be contained and is...
By: Litsa Podaras
About 56 million years ago during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum, (abbreviated as PETM) Earth was bare of ice. It was due to a sudden and massive release of carbon into the atmosphere. Scientists cannot know the exact amount, but they calculate that it would be...
What is a solar flare
By: Joshua Bayes
In the past two weeks there have been reports of yet another large solar flare having been captured in wonderful detail on camera by NASA. Indeed, over the course of the past couple of years, anyone with their ear to the ground of the scientific...
By: Michael Totten
Tsunami alert systems are designed to identify earthquakes likely to produce tsunamis, detect tsunamis as early as possible and warn the affected public when a tsunami is likely to hit the area. The alert system includes detection, analysis and communication. Some parts of the world...
An introduction to the global climate system
By: zteve t evans
No matter where we live on Earth the weather and climate play an important part in our daily lives. The weather is the changing conditions in the atmosphere that occur all around in the present such as rain, snow, wind or sunshine. Climate is regional...
By: Julie Thomas-Zucker
Differences between low and high altitude snow storms tend to be higher wind velocities, more snowfall and lower temperatures. Blizzards are a danger, as are avalanches in the higher altitudes. High altitude snow storms have large accumulations that may last throughout the fall and winter...
By: Cameron Scott
All snow starts as tiny droplets of supercooled water, suspended high in the atmosphere. That's the only way it can freeze into delicate crystalline snowflakes! Those water droplets will stay liquid as long as they're suspended in the air without touching anything. However, the moment...

 

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