How catfish have learned to prey on pigeons
By: Kenneth Andrews
Elton John never saw this part of the Circle of Life coming. According to a post on PLOS blogs , catfish in South West France have been observed hunting pigeons. On dry land. Scientists from the University of Toulouse in the South West of France have...
By: M E Skeel
Bovine tuberculosis, or bTB, is caused by a bacterium called Mycobacterium bovis. M. bovis is closely related to the species that causes human TB (Mycobacterium tuberculosis) and is responsible for outbreaks in wildlife, as well as domestic cattle herds. Not only badgers but rats, rabbits...
By: Emily Keeling
In 2010, parody news site The Onion posted this little gem. Undoubtedly inspired by media buzz about creatures like Koko the Gorilla and the researchers who study them, this satirical piece explores the morality of teaching sign language to (or having complex discussions with) non-human...
By: Emily Keeling
Actually, there are a few false presumptions within this question. First of all, mosquitoes can fly very well in the rain. Their tough exoskeletons make them resistant against raindrops. Represented by roughly 3000 species, mosquitoes can also be found nearly worldwide. The only continent on...
Diet of the sun-tailed monkey
By: Donna Hicks
The sun-tailed monkey is a relatively new discovery in Gabon. The diet of the sun-tailed monkey may be as elusive as this species has been. A brief look at Gabon Gabon is located in West Central Africa. It gained independence from France in 1960. As...
By: Zacharie King
The sun-tailed monkey, known by the scientific name Cercopithecus Solatus, is native to central forests in Gabon and they can be found in no other locations in the world. Discovered in 1986 the sun tailed monkey is listed as a vulnerable species. They have been...
By: Shaheen Daad
Scientists are finding and naming 52 new species every day. You would think that they are only finding microbes and members of the lesser phyla while the mammals and reptiles are well accounted for. But new species of mammals are still being found at a...
By: Lorri B Smalls
Quokkas are small, nocturnal marsupial native to the southwestern parts of the world that belongs to the Wallaby species. Like the joey, the Quokka spends its early life inside of its mother's pouch for about half of the year. Unlike other Wallabies, its physical features...
By: Rena Sherwood
The quokka (Setonix brachyurus) is an endearing little marsupial that appears to be always smiling. They have long hind legs and a tail that they can balance on. Wild quokka are curious about people and will approach them. This friendliness has, unfortunately, led to a...
By: Shannon Farlouis
The quokka has a similar appearance to a kangaroo, and it is native to Western Australia. In Western Australia, there are about 10,000 quokkas. The quokkas have adapted to a variety of habitats, but they prefer dense vegetation and moist conditions. Large numbers of...

 

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