Species other than humans that have sex for pleasure
By: Christyl Rivers
Many species other than humans have sex for pleasure. Although we can never know precisely what degree of pleasure is experienced, it is clear that sex serves for far more than just procreation. One of its greatest benefits may be called social lubrication, as it...
Life cycle of a frog
By: Sylvia Harrison
Remember finding those little tadpoles along the water's edge when you went fishing with dad or grandpa? Those little tadpoles went from cute little "fishy things" to frogs! The process by which frogs evolve from eggs, to tadpoles, to frogs, is called metamorphosis. Metamorphosis is...
By: Julie Thomas-Zucker
In the analysis of bee and wasp sting venom, twenty substances preside. Wasp venom comprises different amounts of each of the ingredients found in honey bee venom listed below. The type of wasp and how the insect injects its venom differs. A bee can only...
By: Daisy Sue
The stinger of bees and wasps is a special organ. It is not only used to deliver venom to the victim in the case of a sting, but it is also used as an ovipositor, or egg laying organ. The stinger, a tubular structure, is...
By: Kristopher Miller
The rainforest is home to almost half of Earth’s most amazing, unusual, and even the most deadly animals. The animals that live in it use different methods to survive in a beautiful yet hostile environment. Camouflage Apart from soldiers using camouflage to disguise themselves...
By: Tim Harry
Eagles are amongst the largest and most impressive of the birds seen in the sky today. They are perhaps not as large as the eagles depicted by Tolkein or in the adventures of Sinbad, but it is actually only in the recent past that eagles...
By: Tim Harry
The Cedar Waxwing, Bombycilla cedrorum, is one of those birds that brings out mixed emotions amongst many people. The sight of a wild bird feeding in a garden is generally a pleasant one, the sight though of a flock devouring all of the fruit and...
How butterflies form
By: Barbara Stanley
Lepidoptera, the scientific name for the butterfly, are insects that live on every continent on earth except Antarctica. Although the female butterfly may lay up to 100 eggs during her life, only two percent usually survive long enough to reproduce. Any place that has a...
How humans benefit from bees
By: Nancy Seddens
Imagine a world without those pesky bees buzzing around. To eliminate the chances of being stung it might just be worth having to do without honey, especially if you are one of the many people who are highly allergic to bee venom. But, as any...
By: Sofia Cruz
For millions of years, bees have been living in this world. Gathering nectar, making honey, defending it from hungry predators, and pollinating flowers has been a great part of their lives. As far as humans have grown, over time, they have derived multiple benefits from...

 

1 79 80 81 82 83 99