Facts about leeches (Phylum Annelida, Class Hirudinea)
By: M E Skeel
Another day, another worm. Today's worm is the leech. Now I know that the word leech gives a lot of people the same creepy feeling as the words tick or head lice, but there is an upside to leeches. After all, a leech used to...
How baby monkeys adapt to their environment
By: Rena Sherwood
Scientists and behaviorists have examined how baby monkeys learn in order to determine how human children learn. Baby monkeys and human babies are very similar. Monkeys, like people, are born with only a few basic instincts, such as knowing which way is up and to...
Migratory patterns of the Humpback whale
By: Johanna Kent
Traveling back and forth from the polar regions of the world, where big weather and food abounds, to tropical climates with gentle breezes and calm waters, humpback whales lead a nomadic lifestyle that many humans would envy.However far their travels seem to take the...
The most venomous reptiles of Central America
By: Joel La Rocque
South America has a vast animal wildlife population. Tourists find the wild primate population fascinating especially along food market strips. Monkey's beg for food and when food is withheld, stealing is an accepted alternative. Either way it is all quite entertaining. Iguanas lounge on park...
Facts about phoronids (phylum phoronida)
By: M E Skeel
The higher multicellular animal world can be divided into two major groups by their embryological development. The majority are protostomes in which the blastopore in the original ball of cells, the blastula, becomes the mouth of the developing organism. The Arthropods, Annelids and Molluscs are...
What are Branchiopods?
By: M E Skeel
Branchiopods are a subclass of the Class Crustacea, that branch of the Arthropods that have mandibles and live in the water. Branchiopods are one of the most primitive groups of crustaceans and first show up in the fossil record back in the middle of the...
By: M E Skeel
Ectoprocts are tiny, sessile marine and freshwater invertebrates that live in colonies. They are moderately successful, having about 500 species worldwide and they are abundant,m found attached to hard substrates such as rocks, shells and wood in the benthos from shallow waters to 6000...
Information about the Myriapods (Centipedes and Millipedes)
By: M E Skeel
Myriapods are terrestrial arthropods with many legs. Centipedes, millipedes and the lesser known pauropods and symphylans are the four main groups of myriapods. None of them have a thousand legs, as the name millipede suggests. The maximum count is 175 pairs, which is still a...
Information about Pentastomes (Phylum Pentastoma)
By: M E Skeel
Pentastomes are also known as tongue worms because their shape is reminiscent of a vertebrate tongue. They are all respiratory parasites of vertebrates with larval forms infecting intermediate hosts such as arthropods and vertebrates. There are about a hundred species world wide and they are...
Information about segmented worms, Phylum Annelida
By: M E Skeel
There are many different sorts of worms but the height of worm evolution is found in the annelids or segmented worms. There are four classes in this phylum. Oligochaetes are terrestrial and freshwater worms that have few hairs. The most commonly recognised are the earthworms...

 

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