Spider webs: A new study about their electrostatic charge
By: Merryl Lentz
Spiders webs are beginning to weave an intriguing new story of how they ensnare their prey. Capture of flying and crawling fodder may not just be a lucky accident – for the spider – but the result of an electrostatic interaction between web and insect...
The life cycle of a box jellyfish
By: Lesley Hebert
With stinging tentacles up to three meters long, and with a transparent body which is nearly impossible to see in the water, the tropical box jellyfish, boxfish or sea wasp is the largest and most venomous member of the lethal box jellyfish family. Although some...
Differences between the Dromedary camel and the Bactrian camel
By: Lesley Hebert
Bactrian camels and dromedary or Arabian camels are large animals known for their humps, their amazing capacity to survive in extremely dry conditions, and their ability to transport people across arid deserts.Bactrian camels probably originated in the cold deserts of the central Asian steppes...
Zoo orangutans are given iPads
By: Lesley Hebert
One of the burning questions that animal rights activists might be tempted to ask is: What does a zookeeper do with a bored orangutan?Well, that question was answered when Michigan-born wildlife activist Richard Zimmerman suggested giving iPads to apathetic apes, and launched Apps for...
Tree profiles: Ponderosa pine
By: Rex Trulove
Ponderosa pines are fairly common trees in the United States, particularly in the west. They have several traits that tend to set them apart from many other pines however. Fully grown, this is a pine that is hard to mistake for other species. This is...
Scientists map oldest flowering plant genome
By: Christine Zibas
Who would expect that the story of one of the oldest plants in the world is a tale filled with sex and gluttony? Yes, survival of the oldest known flowering plant (Amborella trichopoda) is not necessarily the result of rain, but instead of organelles (the...
Scientists unravel secrets through examination of Neanderthal woman's DNA
By: Christine Zibas
What can we say about people who lived 50,000 years ago? Much more than just years ago, thanks to the growing body of knowledge from the collection and modern-day testing of DNA (or deoxyribonucleic acid, the encoded genetic instructions found in all known living...
Natural habitats of otters
By: Jane Grimshaw
Otters are adorable, playful members of the Mustelid family that enjoy a life both in and out of the water. Unfortunately, due to water pollution and habitat loss, the otter has gradually declined in numbers over the years, giving conservationists the difficult task of trying...
Study suggests modern dogs descended from European wolves
By: Christine Zibas
While folklore has suggested for centuries that wolves and man can be friends, it has been a cautionary friendship. Now, however, geneticists have suggested that the relationship between man and wolf (European gray wolves, to be precise) may hold the origins of man’s modern-day...
Scientists discover a new mysterious scorpion species in Turkey
By: Leigh Goessl
Scientists working in Turkey have discovered a new species of scorpion, which has been described as "mysterious" by media outlets. The species was found living in the region known as "Ancient Lycia," which is located in the southwestern section of the country. The scorpion's...

 

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