Olfaction in bacteria
By: Lane Olinghouse
As if humans have too little to worry about, a convocation of mirobioligists recently published data indicating that some bacteria possess the facility of olfaction. Bacteria have long been held responsible, in olfactory terms, for creating a multitude of malodorous bouquets. Some of the more...
Plant profiles: Pennyroyal (Mentha pulegium)
By: Dyfed Lloyd Evans
Pennyroyal (Mentha pulegium) is a perennial herbaceous plant that belongs to the lamiaceae (mint) family. Superficially, it looks like a low-growing form of common garden mint. Like all members of the mint family, the stems have a characteristic square cross section. The leaves are opposite...
By: Michael Totten
With no natural predators, wild burros can have a strong effect on the landscape of the Southwest United States. As of February 2012, there were an estimated 5,841 wild burros in the United States, nearly all of them in Arizona, California, and Nevada. These...
Fish profiles: Electric eel
By: Sylvia Harrison
The scientific name of the Electric Eel is Electrophorus Electricus. Very aptly named, Electric Eels can emit up to 600 volts of electricity! This particular eel is not truly an eel at all, but a type of fish with very few scales. Their snakelike bodies...
By: Dr Pandula Siribaddana
The ability to smell is inherited by almost all developed organisms, which is facilitated by specialized organs and cells. However, until very recent times, scientists were unaware of the olfaction of bacteria although they knew the same to exist among yeast and certain other organisms...
Mushroom profiles: Fly agaric (Amanita muscaria)
By: Christyl Rivers
When one thinks of an Fly agaric mushroom, fairy folk, Santa’s elves, and leprechauns come to mind. But this very beautiful, white spotted on bright red umbrella capped Toadstool, can be lethally toxic. Ancient people’s, especially shamans and druids; have used the potent...
By: Jane Grimshaw
The fly agaric, or fly Amanita, is an iconic mushroom known for its toxicity and hallucinogenic properties. This fairy tale mushroom was officially named and recorded by Swedish botanist Carl Linneus in 1753, where it was listed in his Species Plantarium - a binomial system...
By: Claudia Reynolds
The American chestnut tree (Castanea dentata) was once the undisputed king of the forest, its reign spreading down the Eastern Seaboard from Maine to Florida and covering territory as far west as the Ohio Valley. Its regal beauty was the inspiration for poets, artists and...
Research: Mice learn songs in similar way to humans and birds
By: Elizabeth M Young
Birds and humans can learn songs and use them to engage in social communication. The learning process uses forebrain motor areas that give control over vocal equipment. The brain's cortex sends signals to vocal motor neurons in the brain stem. The bird or human also...
Plant profiles: Trapper's tea (Ledum glandulosum)
By: Safa
Trapper’s tea, also known as Western Labrador tea, belongs to the botanical family Ericaceae. Formerly, it was scientifically referred to as Ledum glandulosum, which has now been changed to Rhododendran neoglandulosum. Trapper’s tea is an evergreen shrub native to the U.S., commonly...

 

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