How animals recognize each other
By: Effie Moore Salem
Animals have built-in mechanisms by which they recognize their own. Memory plays a big role in this. Their DNA is a blueprint by which every instinct in every habit is mapped. There is scarce information on the Internet about how animals recognize their own; therefore...
Pines and firs
By: Shannon Farlouis
There are basic differences that exist between pine and fir trees. Some of these differences are botanical name, native ranges and cone shape. They also have different foliage characteristics. You can tell the difference between the two by focusing on needle clusters and length. Pine...
Why deer shed their antlers
By: L. Woodrow Ross
In late winter or early spring, white-tailed buck deer (Odocoileus virginianus), develop two hard, bony antlers that are elongated and branched. They are on the forehead, between the ears and are used for defense and in battle with other bucks to secure mates. Bucks with...
The importance of heritage seeds
By: Christyl Rivers
Food is culture. In every society, climate, customs and availability of choice depends upon local food choices. Even civilization is affected by how much food production allows them freedom from hunger and time to develop and improve technology, science and art.Heirloom seeds have many...
Tips for identifying raspberry plants
By: Vilie Farah
Raspberries are delicious and very healthy fruits. You can discover both wild-growing and cultivated raspberries. Nothing could be more pleasing than picking the tempting red fruit off the bush yourself.Yet, how do you identify raspberries? If you lack knowledge about the way that the...
How scientists track blue whales
By: Mark Nigellsen
They are the largest creatures on earth. They can dive 300 feet or more beneath the ocean surface and remain below for an hour at a time. Even today, much is still unknown about blue whales. So how do scientists hoping to learn more about...
Why fireflies glow
By: Tom Sherman
Before Thomas Edison unwittingly destroyed the boundaries of nature and disrupted the essential mechanics of evolution, light was a function of nature usually reserved to the depths of space; distant orbs littered across the cosmos sustain life during the day and save the night from...
About bitterroot (Lewisia rediviva)
By: ArtisticDreaming
Bitterroot, a small perennial herb, is the state flower of Montana. It gets its name from the extremely bitter flavor of its roots. The latin name is lewisia rediviva. Lewisia means “Lewis” and was named by Frederick Pursh in honor of Meriwether Lewis, of...
Why fireflies glow
By: Merryl Lentz
Fireflies - also known as lightning bugs - may not seem like the brightest bulbs on the planet, but males and females have glowing abdomens that each finds dazzling and irresistible. Not only do fireflies glow to work their apparently considerable charms upon potential mates...
Mexico reports decline in Monarch butterfly population
By: John Atchison
Mother Nature can be a fierce lady, raining down some unthinkable terrors at a moments notice. Whether it is the unrelenting power of a tornado or the awesome fury of a hurricane, nature has a way of tipping the karmic scales. However, not everything it...

 

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