History of the Coca Leaf in Peru - Cultural Focus
By: Bridget Webber
The coca plant, from the family Erythroxylaceae, is more than a simple shrub for the people of the Andes where it grows. For them it is a magical and medicinal plant used to cement friendship, and as an intermediate to communicate with Gods, plus a...
Types of pigment granules that accumulate in the cytoplasm of human cells
By: Alicia M Prater PhD
Pigment granules accumulate in human cells for various reasons. The granules may be stored in the organelles that produce and/or transport them, or they may be cytoplasmic inclusion bodies that result from aging or disease. Organelles are found in the cytoplasm of the cell, as...
History of the Coca Leaf in Peru - Cultural Focus
By: Colette Georgii
The coca plant has been around since about 3000 BC according to Evo Morales, the President of Bolivia and also coca farmer, who seeks to reestablish the plant as the main cash crop in that country and create more economic stability for the coca farmers...
By: Stephanie D Hall
The coca leaf is a plant native to north western South America. It is generally thought that coca originally appeared in the northern Andes, where conditions for it to grow uncultivated were optimal, and that as the benefits of coca were realised it was cultivated...
History of the Coca Leaf in Peru - Cultural Focus
By: Holle Abee
The coca leaf is a huge part of Peruvian culture and has been for centuries. For many South Americans, coca is part of their everyday lives, much like coffee is for inhabitants of other parts of the world. Coca, however, also holds important significance in...
Characteristics and habits of tree frogs (family Hylidae)
By: M E Skeel
Tree frogs have large finger and toe pads which enable them to climb vertical surfaces like tree trunks, so many of them have taken to an arboreal life, as their common name suggests. Tree frogs are mostly found throughout the Americas and in Australia. There...
Sin Complete Agreement second Law Thermo Dynamics
By: Jay O'Toole
Devolution is more consistent with life as it actually exists today, since devolution and the Second Law of Thermo-Dynamics are terms that can be used interchangeably in the humble opinion of this writer. Furthermore, the assumption that evolutionary processes, (either positively or negatively) could explain...
By: Amanda Mittra
There are two trophic levels in an ecosystem, namely the autotrophs and the heterotroophs. In simple terms, there are two sets of members placed in an ecosystem based on their modes of energy production. Autotrophs are those that produce energy from sunlight and inorganic material...
By: Christa Martin
Although whales and fish both live in water, this is the only way in which they are the same. There are a multitude of features which determine the difference between a fish and a whale, which includes such details as scientific classification, biological structure and...
How autotrophs differ from heterotrophs in obtaining energy
By: Lisa Putnam
Every living organism needs energy to survive. Energy can be gained by consuming food. There are two main ways living organisms can get food and they are grouped as either being an autotroph or heterotroph. Autotrophs, also known as producers, have the unique ability to...

 

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