By: Judy Evans
The genus Rhodanthe belongs in the daisy (Asteraceae) family. The nomenclature was revised in the 1990s and this genus is now considered exclusively Australian. Plants now in this genus were once classified as ‘Helichrysum’ or ‘Helipterum’. It has the common names of everlasting...
Overview of the Australian species of the genus Sarcochilus
By: Judy Evans
The Sarcochilus genus is endemic to eastern Australia and New Caledonia. There are around 20 of these diminutive species with 16 of them coming from Australia. The common name is fairy orchid and they may be epiphytic (growing on branches or tree-trunks) or lithophytic (growing...
Similarities and differences between plant and animal cells
By: Tami Port MS
Both plant and animal cells are eukaryotic, with many similarities, but there are also key differences between the cells of plants and animals. Here is a summary.Living things are made of cells, the most basic unit of life. All cells fall into one of...
By: Sammy Stein
Plants are amazing organisms and plant growth is varied with many different forms and adaptations to different environmental niches. However, whatever adaptations a plant has made to cope with heat, drought, water, ice, poor soils or contamination, there are certain factors which affect growth. Temperature...
By: Sammy Stein
Many fungi perform invaluable, useful activites without which our world would be very different. Fungi are nature's garbage disposal machines. Many fungi break down the dead bodies of animals and plants to release nutrients back to the soil. If these locked up nutrients were not...
Anatomy of a deer
By: Jesse Vorton
Deer, much like humans are mammals. Mammals of course are known to have their young seat on the mother's milk from the mother's nipple. Much like other mammals deer are also warm-blooded. Being warm-blooded means that the deer's body temperature maintains a fairly consistent temperature...
By: Sammy Stein
Photosynthesis is the process whereby a plant manufactures food from sunlight, carbon dioxide and water. The word means 'light making' or' making from light ' and it is important because plants are the first organisms in a long food chain to capture the energy from...
By: Judy Evans
The templetonia genus has just 11 species, all of them endemic to southern and western Australia. While all are shrubs or subshrubs with similar flowers, they vary in form with some having no leaves and others having small, scale-like leaves. The templetonia belongs to the...
Plant profiles: Australian Swainsonia genus
By: Judy Evans
Swainsona is part of the family Fabaceae. The genus consists of perennials and subshrubs. There are around 50 species in the Swainsona genus with all but one being endemic to Australia. The plants are legumes and have small racemes or spikes bearing ridged pea-flowers. The...
By: Judy Evans
The Pultenaea genus is endemic to Australia – all 100 odd species of them. They belong in the pea-flower subfamily which itself is part of the legume (Fabaceae) family. Most species are in the eastern states with only a few native to South Australia and...

 

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