By: Erich Rosenberger M.D.
There are two primary ways that a cell can divide in to two new cells. The first process is called mitosis, and the other is meiosis. In mitosis, a single cell divides in to two identical copies. This is the process for just about every...
The mechanism of cellular respiration
By: Erich Rosenberger M.D.
Cells breathe? Well, not really - at least not in the same sense that people breathe. Despite this, there is a process in a cell known as cellular respiration. It's also called oxidative metabolism, depending on which particular textbook you may be learning from. Whatever...
By: Erich Rosenberger M.D.
The structure and function of neurons is one of the more interesting aspects of human anatomy and physiology. Neurons are special cells that are able to send electrical and chemical signals around to various parts of the body. There are many different types of neurons...
By: Erich Rosenberger M.D.
In the last few years, carbohydrates have become a major topic in the world of nutrition. Eat lots of them - don't eat any; the debate rages on like a gigantic sugary pendulum. But what exactly is a carbohydrate and what are the functions of...
How dogs have evolved
By: William Mataba
For those of us who have been lucky enough to experience the atmosphere, warmth, and congeniality of the African fireside, the world of nature becomes an important part of our psyche. For, while we sit around a fire, the canopy of darkness is painted by...
By: Judy Evans
The sheoak (she-oak) is endemic to Australia. Sheoaks are actually flowering plants and belong to the genus Allocasuarina and the family Casuarinaceae. The sheoak may also be called the ironwood, bull-oak (buloke) or beefwood. The species Allocasuarina luehmannii gives its name to the Shire of...
By: Judy Evans
The Red or Scarlet Flowering Gum grows to around 10m tall. It is an evergreen tree whose deep green leaves form a thick canopy. It is one of the best of the Australian native shade trees. Its natural habitat is on the south coast of...
Trees of Australia: Marri
By: Judy Evans
The Marri tree is one of the most common of the eucalypts found in the south-west forests of Western Australia (WA). It is not found outside of the south west corner of WA. The marri was formerly referred to as Eucalyptus calophylla but in 1995...
By: Judy Evans
Nuytsia floribunda (Western Australian Christmas tree or simply Christmas tree) is a root hemi-parasite. It is named in honour of Pieter Nuyts who was a 17th century Dutch explorer and colonial official. It belongs to the family Loranthaceae, the mistletoes. The Christmas tree is unique...
By: Judy Evans
The quaintly named Snottygobble is one of 90 species of Persoonia. Four of these species occur in the south-west of Western Australia (WA). It is a key component of the mid-storey level of WA’s jarrah forests. The snottygobble grows well on laterite (gravelly) soils...

 

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