The history of microbiology
By: Effie Moore Salem
More than ever medical scientists ae now relying on the history of microbiology is the ongoing history of how scientists are conquering disease processes. They must know what has been before they can proceed to uncover more leads into how these can help their quest...
The diverse functions of RNA
By: Megan Worley
RNA has a wide variety of functions within each and every cell. Known fully as Ribonucleic acid, RNA functions differently than DNA. While DNA is primarily the storage material for genetic information, RNA is a carrier of genetic information, a catalyst for biochemical reactions, an...
By: Nancy Houser
Before the invention of the microscope, the history of microbiology was pretty much nonexistent. When Robert Hooke, an English scientist, first developed the microscope for his scientific studies in the mid-1600s, he pushed the scientific foundation of microbiology toward an unbelievable future. His book, "Micrographia"...
A look at algae's symbiotic relationships
By: Effie Moore Salem
Symbiotic relationships mean that two individual organisms live together while each derives nourishment from the other. It is amazing at how some organisms large and small, colorful or dull, life giving or life getting, manage to go through their life spans living off the productivity...
By: Janet Grischy
Before the microscope, ideas about invisible agents that caused or influenced life processes were speculation, not science. One man, Abbas Ibn Firnas, experimented with lenses in Cordobaaround 840 C.E., but his work was lost. A light microscope was first made in the Netherlands in...
Life span of a dragonfly
By: Carole Meisenhelter
Nature lovers around the world still continue to be captivated by this eye-catching aquatic insect, the dragonfly. Belonging to the Odonata order, the dragonfly with its large bulging compound eyes, three smaller eyes known as ocelli, and two pair of sturdy multi-veined translucent wings, has...
What are echinoderms? (Phylum Echinodermata)
By: M E Skeel
Echinoderm: the name means spiny skin but we aren't talking about porcupines, unless we rename sea urchins the porcupines of the sea. Sea urchins are the spiniest members of the marine phylum Echinodermata. Other echinoderms are starfish, brittle stars, the lesser known crinoids, and the...
A look at bacteriology
By: J. Morris
A look at bacteriology The current science of bacteriology includes the study of prokaryotic cells. Bacteria are a group of single-cell microorganisms with a prokaryotic' cellular structure, which primarily refers to its genetic material and the fact that it is not bound by a membrane...
By: Janet Grischy
Epidemiologists study the factors that affect the health of whole populations. Their training is in statistics as well as in disease and this enables them to look at the whole picture of the spread of sickness through a group. Epidemiologists may research vectors: the routes...
A look at algae's symbiotic relationships
By: M E Skeel
Algae can produce their own food by photosynthesis, so why do they need to associate with other organisms? The answer is simple: protection. Single celled algae are susceptible to predation and water loss. By themselves, they cannot survive out of water and they have no...

 

1 133 134 135 136 137 371