Butterflies and moths
By: M E Skeel
Butterflies and moths belong to the insect order Lepidoptera, which means scaly-winged. These scales give butterflies their colour and moths their camouflage. For the most part, moths are nocturnal while butterflies are diurnal. The Lepidoptera are holometabolous insects which means they have complete life cycles...
An overview of the many species of ocean reef animals
By: M E Skeel
Coral reefs are found in shallow tropical oceans and seas around the world. They are the most diverse and complex marine ecosystems, with an estimated 90% of the species in less than 7% of the total marine area. They are the rainforests of the marine...
The evolution of humans
By: Tony Chiodo
Three and a half million years ago two of our ancestors walked across a field of damp volcanic ash, not realizing that they were achieving a kind of immortality. This occurred in East Africa in what is now Tanzania in a place called Laetoli. Although...
Using Frozen Animal Sperm to Repopulate the Wild
By: R.A. Scott
Putting human male sperm on ice is something that has been a part of reproductive science for a significant amount of time. Placing animal sperm on ice and then rejuvenating it has proven much more problematic. Recently however several animal species have successfully given birth...
Biology: The Golgi apparatus
By: Rohit Kulkarni
The Golgi apparatus or the Golgi complex is a series of unconnected cup-shaped structures called cisternae which are bound to the membrane. It was first discovered by an Italian physician Camillo Golgi in 1898 and then named after him. Usually, there is only one Golgi...
The cell nucleus
By: Rohit Kulkarni
Nucleus is the central processing unit of the cell. It is called the brain of the cell. Using the same analogy, just like the brain stores all the information about our body and life, and facilitates the bodily functions centrally, nucleus stores the information about...
Pregnant Fathers and the Modern World
By: Edwin Rydberg
A man's pregnancy may have sociological as well as biological implications, but the former are largely irrelevant and stated only as excuses by those who would shackle us with their own romanticized notions of the past. Notions that have at one time included: slavery, repression...
By: Jim Bessey
Bacteria rule the world. No matter where you go or what you're doing, you cannot escape them. Nor would you want to. They're inside you, on every surface you touch, in the air you breath, and an integral part of every living thing around you...
The meaning of human engineering
By: Jae Baeli
From Genocide to Neo-Eugenics*The constative issue of eugenics is one fraught with both peril and promise. Can the association with Hitler be put aside long enough to consider this issue without the onerous specter of the Holocaust and the efforts to create an Aryan race...
What are pycnogonids?
By: M E Skeel
Pycnogonids are a Class of Arthropods called sea spiders, because they resemble spiders and live in the oceans. They are slow-moving, crawling predators, usually white or pale yellow or orange in colour. Most have 8 jointed legs (although a few have 10 or 12 legs)...

 

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