Biological success: Examples from the animal kingdom
By: Jennifer Allsbrook
Biological success, as measured in terms of Darwinian fitness, refers to the ability of an organism to survive and reproduce successfully. Differential reproductive success is the key to a species' evolution over time. Individuals with the most favorable traits in a particular environment will be...
By: Michael Totten
Taxonomy is the science of classifying species by assigning each species a degree of relatedness to other species. In general, the more alike one species to another, the closer together those two species will be classified. At its broadest, redwood sequoias and sunflowers and kelp...
By: Michael Totten
Blood is not a primary component of a mosquito's diet. In fact, almost the entire diet of male and female mosquitoes alike consists of nectar, a fact which many plants take advantage of in order to cross-pollinate. The male mosquito doesn't even have a proboscis...
By: Carol H. Morgan
The main thing that there is to know about language acquisition among gorillas is that there really isn't any to speak of. Language seems to be one of the skills that we as humans gain access to from their enormously swolen cerebral cortex, and other...
Honey bees and homing senses
By: Perry McCarney
Honey bees first originated in tropical Eurasia some eight to eleven million years ago. There are now at least ten distinct species and numerous sub-species, predominantly in Asia, such as the Asian giant or rock honey bee (Apis dorsata), the Asian dwarf honey bee (Apis...
By: Michael Totten
While the most common Chinese word for panda translates as "large cat bear", the giant panda is not a cat and may not be a bear. Although it is currently considered part of the bear family (Ursidae), until recently it was classed among the raccoon...
The reason why only female mosquitoes suck blood
By: Dawn R. Cole
The world is populated with roughly 3,000 species of mosquitoes. Both sexes are actually nectar feeders but in many species, the female members are capable of hematophagy (sucking the blood from other animals.) Why blood? Female mosquitoes do not require blood for their...
Explaining the taxonomic classification system
By: Dawn R. Cole
Taxonomy is a classification system used in biology. Is it a way for scientists to identify and name all of the living organisms that live on our planet. Biologists use taxonomy to group organisms displaying similar characteristics together and study things like, their relationships, chemical...
How whales evolved
By: Dawn R. Cole
Acceptable scientific theory has determined that life began in the oceans and, through millions of years of evolutionary transitions, sea creatures began to develop limbs instead of fins and flippers, and crawled out of the oceans to become the first land-dwellers. One might logically conclude...
By: Lee Templar
Whales are among the most specialised of all mammals. Their evolutionary adaptations to a wholly aquatic life have led to a body structure that has made them almost physically unrecognisable as mammals at all, and many people hold a popular misconception they are fish.The...

 

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